Elements of International Law

Couverture
Little, Brown, 1866 - 749 pages

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Table des matières

Parties to Civil War entitled to Rights of War against each other
23
International Effects of a Change in the Person of the Sovereign
29
Semisovereign States
33
What Persons are authorized to engage in Hostilities against
38
Single or united States
40
Supreme Federal Government or Compositive State
52
ABSOLUTE INTERNATIONAL RIGHTS OF STATES
57
Manche La 25 Law Reporter
60
Modifications of Right of Selfdefence
70
Germanic Confederation
74
Independence of every State in respect to the Choice of its Rulers
76
Treaties on this Subject
81
Quadruple Alliance of 1834
87
Foreign Marriages
92
Exemption of Foreign Ministers
98
Embargo previous to Declaration of Hostilities
100
Jurisdiction of a State over its Public and Private Vessels on
100
Consular Jurisdiction
108
Laws of Trade and Navigation
114
Piracy under the Law of Nations
115
Decisions of Courts of Justice in England
134
Rights of Negotiation and Treaties
143
Precedence among Princes and States enjoying Royal Honors
156
Right of making War in whom vested
158
CHAPTER IV
162
Claim of United States and England to the Oregon Territory 17274
177
Form of Treaty
180
Claims to Portions of the Sea on the Ground of Prescription
181
Armed Neutrality in 1788
184
Ports Mouths of Rivers
188
Treaties of Vienna respecting the Great European Rivers
196
Navigation of the St Lawrence
204
Usage of Permanent Diplomatic Missions
207
Public or Solemn
219
Consuls and Commercial Agents
220
Cartels Truces and Capitulations
226
Exemption of the Ministers House and Property
228
Duties and Taxes
243
Sponsions
253
Hubbard 2 Cranch 187
258
Justification of refusal to ratify
260
Extent of Judicial Power over Resident Foreigners
265
Freedom of Consent how far necessary to the Validity of Treaties
267
Proceedings against Absent Parties
274
The Native Character easily reverts
323
Merchants residing in the East
334
National Character of Ships
341
Enemys Property how far subject to Capture and Confiscation
346
Ravaging of the Enemys Territory when lawful
352
Privateers
359
Recapture of Neutral Property
366
What constitutes a Settingforth as a Vessel of War
380
75
384
Condemnation of Property lying in the Ports of an Ally
386
lojust Sentence of a Foreign Court is Ground for Reprisal
389
Distinction between Municipal Tribunals and Courts of Prize 392
389
Period of its Operation
389
Ransom of Captured Property
389
Different Species of Neutrality
389
Neutrality Modified by a Limited Alliance with one of the Bellige
376
Vessels chased into the Neutral Territory and there captured 429
391
Limitations of the Neutral Jurisdiction to restore in Cases of Illegal
397
Immunity of the Neutral Territory how far extended to Neutral
403
76
409
Distinction between Public and Private Vessels
410
Mary and Susan The 1 Wheaton 54
417
Neutral Vessels laden with Enemys Goods subject to Confiscation
419
Goods of a Friend on board the Ships of an Enemy
425
Harrison 16 Howard 190 Fabrigas v Mostyn 1 Cowper 165
437
The Two Maxims of Free Ships Free Goods and Enemy
439
Conventional Law as to Free Ships Free Goods
447
Armed Neutrality of 1800
452
Prize Courts of the United States condemn Enemys Goods in Neu
469
Matchless The 1 Haggard 97 668
473
et
502
Carrying Diplomatic Despatches
504
Messengers and Carriers
504
Rule of the War of 1756
531
CHAPTER II
508
Right of Visitation and Search
524
Forcible Resistance by an Enemy Master
528
CHAPTER IV
Freedom of Religious Worship
Uti possidetis the Basis of every Treaty of Peace unless the con
Rights of Civil and Criminal Legislation
Distinction between the Rules of Decision and of Proceeding
Lex domicilii
et

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Expressions et termes fréquents

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Page 60 - In the wars of the European powers, in matters relating to themselves, we have never taken any part, nor does it comport with our policy so to do.
Page 264 - British fishermen shall use (but not to dry or cure the same on that island) and also on the coasts, bays and creeks of all other of His Britannic Majesty's dominions in America...
Page 173 - It is agreed that any country that may be claimed by either party on the northwest coast of America, westward of the Stony Mountains, shall, together with its harbors, bays, and creeks, and the navigation of all rivers within the same, be free and open for the term of ten years from the date of the signature of the present convention, to the vessels, citizens, and subjects of the two Powers...
Page 60 - Our policy in regard to Europe, which was adopted at an early stage of the wars which have so long agitated that quarter of the globe, nevertheless remains the same, which is, not to interfere in the internal concerns of any of its powers...
Page 57 - In the discussions to which this interest has given rise and in the arrangements by which they may terminate the occasion has been judged proper for asserting, as a principle in which the rights and interests of the United States are involved, that the American continents, by the free and independent condition which they have assumed and maintain, are henceforth not to be considered as subjects for future colonization by any European powers...
Page 57 - It is impossible that the Allied Powers should extend their political system to any portion of either continent without endangering our peace and happiness; nor can any one believe that our southern brethren, if left to themselves, would adopt it of their own accord. It is equally impossible, therefore, that we should behold such interposition in any form with indifference.
Page 180 - America not included within the abovementioned limits; provided, however, that the American fishermen shall be admitted to enter such bays or harbours for the purpose of shelter and of repairing damages therein, of purchasing wood, and of obtaining water, and for no other purpose whatever.
Page 510 - The neutral flag covers enemy's goods, with the exception of contraband of war ; 3. Neutral goods, with the exception of contraband of war, are not liable to capture under enemy's flag; 4. Blockades, in order to be binding, must be effective ; that is to say, maintained by a force sufficient really to prevent access to the coast of the enemy.
Page 115 - ... the felonious and forcible taking from the person of another of goods or money to any value, by violence or putting him in fear...
Page 171 - Line; and, in like manner, His Catholic Majesty cedes to the said United States, all his rights, claims, and pretensions to any Territories, East and North of the said Line, and, for himself, his heirs and successors, renounces all claim to the said Territories forever.

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