Original treatises dating from the xiith to xviiith centuries on the arts of painting in oil ... and on glass, of gilding, dyeing [&c.] with tr., prefaces and notes by mrs. Merrifield, Volume 1

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1849
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Page ccxiv - ... under that name must be understood every kind of blue pigment, separated from plants by fermentation, and converted into a friable substance by desiccation ; for those who should maintain that real indigo must be made from those plants named in the botanical system...
Page 15 - Experimenta diversa alia quam de coloribus. Liber Theophili admirabilis et doctissimi magistri de omni scientia picturae artis. Liber Magistri Petri de Sancto Audemaro de coloribus faciendis. Eraclii sapientissimi viri liber primus et metricus de coloribus et de artibus Romanorum. Ejusdem liber secundus, item metricus. Ejusdem liber tertius sed prosaicus de coloribus et artibus praedictis. De coloribus ad pingendum capitula scripta et notata a Johanne Archerio seu Alcherio anno Domini 1398 ut accepit...
Page 131 - Perfondes eos aqua frigida fac inde tortulas ad similitudinem panis mittes que ea in igne donee omnino candescant. Postquam diutissime canduerint et postea friguerint mitte partem in vas fictile perfunde urina, move ligno, cum que residerent lucide perfunde rubeum folium et teres illud modice super lapidem addens ei quartam partem vivae calcis, et cum tritum fuerit, et sufficienter perfusum cola per pannum et trahe cum pincello ubi volueris tenue deinde spissius et si placet in similitudinem palii...
Page 186 - Recueil d'Antiquites,' tom. iii. p. 193, which is thought to be enclosed between two strata of glass, probably in the manner described in the text. One stratum of the glass mentioned by Caylus was blue, the other was colourless. From the recipe in the text, it may be conjectured that this method of gilding on glass was followed by the Romans, and early Italian school, which existed contemporaneously, although independently of the Byzantine school, at the time when the MS. of Eraclius was written....
Page cclxxiii - Those made with the oils of linseed, bays, poppyseeds, and nuts, and with the balsam of copaiba and turpentine, being diluted with four times their quantity of spirit of turpentine, formed hard, tenacious, glossy varnishes, which dried sufficiently quick, and appeared greatly preferable to those made in the common manner from melted amber.
Page 243 - Dein compositi aliud monstrant, nam ut in medicinae confectionibus species sibi permixte invicem conferuut, sic colores non ejusdem qualitatis, ut partem ex alterius natura, partem ex sua trahant, et quam plurimas eorum varietates pulcras et delectabiles reddant, simul commiscentur. In qua commixtione, et in eo modo quo in pictura alter alteri post se ponuntur, summa est subtilitas; siquidem post album, niger, aut rubeus medius, convenit; quoniam crocus, in temperacione, mediocritas secunda est,...
Page lix - ... making the lights with the whitest pieces of the spindle tree. In order to produce the shades, it was the practice of some artists to singe the wood by the fire ; while others used oil of sulphur and a solution of corrosive sublimate and arsenic. St. Audemar (No. 165) mentions that saffron was used to stain box-wood yellow ; but he does not say to what use the wood was put when stained. The subjects most proper for Tarsia work are perspective representations of buildings full of windows and angular...
Page xx - There were no wooden-handled knives, nor more than one or two drinking cups, in. a house. Candles of wax or tallow were unknown ; a servant held a torch during supper. The clothes of men were of leather unlined : scarcely any gold or silver was seen on their dress. The common...
Page xxvii - In the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries the houses of the English, of the middle and lower classes, consisted in general of a ground-floor only, divided into two apartments, namely, a hall, into which the principal door opened, and which was the room for cooking, eating, and receiving visitors ; and a chamber adjoining the hall, and opening out of it, which was the private apartment of the females of the family and the bed1 See the First and Second Reports of the Commissioners of Fine Arts.
Page cv - Italy,' are so appropriate and judicious, that I shall make no apology for introducing them here. " They are," he says, " probably by Gaudenzio Ferrari,6 who excelled in this branch of art; and many of the figures are of exquisite workmanship. The two finest groups are the Garden of Olives, and the Scourging of our Lord, which last, without being in the least disgusting or painful, is most deeply affecting. One of the i Materials, &c., p. 170.

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