The History of England: Related in Familiar Conversations, by a Father to His Children: Interspersed with Moral and Instructive Remarks and Observations on the Most Leading and Interesting Subjects. Designed for the Perusal of Youth, Volume 1

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Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown, 1818
 

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Page 296 - But if you have already determined of me, and that not only my death, but an infamous slander must bring you the enjoying of your desired happiness; then I desire of God, that he will pardon your great sin therein, and likewise mine enemies, the instruments thereof; and that he will not call you to a strict account for your unprincely and cruel usage of me, at his general...
Page 301 - The Family Shakspeare ; in which nothing is added to the Original Text ; but those words and expressions are omitted which cannot with propriety be read aloud. By T. BOWDLEB, Esq. FRS New Edition, in Volumes for the Pocket ; with 36 Wood Engravings, from Designs by Smirke, Howard, and other Artists.
Page 296 - ... for whose sake I am now as I am, whose name I could some good while since have pointed unto your grace, being not ignorant of my suspicion therein.
Page 295 - You have chosen me, from a low estate, to be your Queen and companion, far beyond my desert or desire. If then you found me worthy of such honour, good your Grace let not any light fancy, or bad counsel of mine enemies, withdraw...
Page 294 - Boleyn; with which name and place I could willingly have contented myself, if God and your grace's pleasure had been so pleased. Neither did I at any time so...
Page 303 - Systematic Education, or Elementary Instruction in the various departments of Literature and Science; with practical rules for studying each branch of useful knowledge.
Page 294 - Your Grace's displeasure, and my imprisonment, are things so strange unto me, as what to write, or what to excuse, I am altogether ignorant. Whereas you send unto me (willing me to confess a truth, and so obtain your favour) by such an one, whom you know to be mine ancient professed enemy; I no sooner received this message by him than I rightly conceived your meaning; and if, as you say, confessing a truth, indeed may procure my safety, I shall with all willingness and duty perform your command.
Page 296 - My last and only request shall be, That myself may only bear the burthen of your Grace's displeasure, and that it may not touch the innocent souls of those poor Gentlemen who (as I understand) are likewise in strait imprisonment for my sake. If ever I have found favour in your sight, if ever the name of Anne Boleyn hath been pleasing in your ears, then let me obtain this request...
Page 195 - You would have thought the very windows spake, So many greedy looks of young and old Through casements darted their desiring eyes UpQn his visage, and that all the walls, With painted imagery, had said at once, — "Jesu preserve thee! welcome, Bolingbroke!
Page 208 - there is more joy in heaven over one sinner that repenteth, than over ninety and nine just persons that need no repentance.

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