The Jungle

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McClelland & Stewart, 2 avr. 2019 - 285 pages
Upton Sinclair's dramatic and deeply moving story exposed the brutal conditions in the Chicago stockyards at the turn of the nineteenth century and brought into sharp moral focus the apalling odds against which immigrants and other working people struggled for their share of the American dream. Denounced by the conservative press as an un-American libel on the meatpacking industry, The Jungle was championed by more progressive thinkers, including then president Theodore Roosevelt, and was a major catalyst to the passing of the Pure Food and Meat Inspection act, which has tremendous impact to this day.

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LibraryThing Review

Avis d'utilisateur  - amyolivia - LibraryThing

While the story is not something I was riveted by, the beauty of the language kept me interested. The end of the book got a little preachy, but overall, it was an interesting and eye-opening story. Consulter l'avis complet

LibraryThing Review

Avis d'utilisateur  - CassandraT - www.librarything.com

This book has been very influential to me. But I can't say I "really liked it." Consulter l'avis complet

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À propos de l'auteur (2019)

UPTON SINCLAIR (1878-1968) was born in Baltimore. At age fifteen, he began writing a series of dime novels in order to pay for his education at the City College of New York. He was later accepted to do graduate work at Columbia, and while there he published a number of novels, including The Journal of Arthur Stirling (1903) and Manassas (1904). Sinclair’s breakthrough came in 1906 with the publication of The Jungle, a scathing indictment of the Chicago meat-packing industry. His later works include World’s End (1940), Dragon’s Teeth (1942), which won him a Pulitzer Prize, O Shepherd, Speak! (1949) and Another Pamela (1950).

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