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ABOVE

THE TEMPEST.

87

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and excitement, noise and tumult; but, nevertheless, there is a wonderful calmness and peace in mountain solitudes. I have stood on mountain crags and seen the tempest rage beneath, not above me; where I stood not a throb disturbed the quiet; beneath were clouds, but where I stood the mountain was bathed in sunlight; if I wanted to get into the uproar and the tempest I was obliged to descend.

“So great heights in life are pervaded by a stillness and calm-great thoughts and great ideas, are quiet thoughts and quiet ideas; they come in silence, not in noise. But I fear it is of no use speaking to you of quiet things while the blood pulsates madly through your veins, and you look forward to the strife and contention you are to wage among your fellows in the world. Recollect, however, to aim high ; 'set your affections on things above. You have the greatest of all examples you can strive to imitate; One who is not only a model but a helper, who is ever willing to stretch out a hand to help you up to great heights; and if by His aid you strive to attain unto His likeness and to be where He is, you will in time reach the highest of all high heights it is possible for human creatures to attain. Look up, boys, look up, and climb up."

CHAPTER VI.

ABOUT

THE RIVAL SCHOOLS.— A Talk

FIGHTING

Quarrelling dogs come halting home."

If you will not hear Reason, she will surely rap your knuckles.

The dog that is quarrelsome and not strong, woe to his hide."

He overcometh a stout enemy that overcometh his own passion.

When passion enters at the foregate, wisdom goes out at the postern."

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CHAPTER VI.

THE RIVAL SCHOOLS.-A TALK ABOUT FIGHTING.

N almost every small town there are rival

schools, between the different scholars of

which a jealousy, and sometimes an enmity, exists. Every opportunity is sought to give expression to these feelings, either by words or blows, so that a constant warfare is kept up, and continual skirmishes are taking place, in which the smaller boys come off second best; for, being less able to take care of themselves, they are waylaid and thrashed in quiet corners and solitary places, where their cries can bring no companions to their assistance. Very frequently this rivalry exists between schools of the same standing, but more often between the boys of the respectable school and those who are so low down in the world as to attend that aided, and almost supported, by charity.

Braintree was no exception to this rule. A fierce

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