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QUESTIONS FOR EXAMINATION

ON THE INDEFINITE PRONOUNS.

What are indefinite pronouns ?
When is autre a pronoun ?

What is the difference between l'un l'autre and l'un et l'autre ?

When l'un l'autre is governed by a preposition, where is that preposition placed in French?

When is the verb put in the singular, and when in the plural, after ni l'un ni l'autre ?

What signification has the pronoun on?

When is l'on used instead of on?

How is the English word however rendered when it occurs before an adjective?

How is whatever rendered when before a substantive?
How, when before a verb?

How is it rendered in French when it can be turned in English into all that which?

When is tout declinable, and when is it not?

EXERCISES ON THE INDEFINITE PRONOUNS.

1. EXERCISE ON RULES 1 ANnd 2, p. 82.

Your brother has lost his books; shall I give him others ?

perdu

-I doubt whether any other could act with (so much)

doute que quelque

pút agir

avez cassé

autant de

simplicity as you do. As you broke my penknife,

canif, m. you (shall give) me another.-Other people's opinions

que

donnerez

6 Comme

(82-2)

sentiment, m.

are not the rule of mine.-Do not speak ill of other

règle, f.

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parlez mal

people, if you (will have nobody speak) ill of you.— voulez que personne ne parle

Always

remember

that principle

principe, m.

souvenez-vous de

of natural law;

naturel loi, f. (do not do) to others what you (would not wish) that voudriez pas

ne faites pas

(they should do) to you.—What are other people's troubles,

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II. EXERCISE ON RULES 3 AND 4, p. 82.

peine, f.

Fire and water destroy one another. My cousins se détruisent

cannot bear each other.-Love one another*, said our ne peuvent se souffrir Aimez-vous

disciple.

dit

Lord to his disciples.-The seasons follow one another Seigneur saison, f. se suivent without interruption.-Rogues always mistrust one ano

sans

Fripons

se défient de

ther.—They do justice to one another.-It is rare to

se rendent

rare de

hear two authors speak well of one another.-Multientendre auteur dire du bien

Multi

plication teaches to multiply two numbers by each plication, f. enseigne à multiplier nombre, m. par

other. The columns were close against one another. colonne, f. étaient serrées contre

III. EXERCISE ON RULES 5-9, p. 83.

Both serve to the same purpose.-My father and mother méme usage, m.

servent

2

1

campagne, f.

sont

set off last week for the country; but (both of them) are partirent already returned; and both intend to stay in town all déjà revenus; se proposent de rester en the winter.-I called on your cousins, and I heard that hiver, m. ai passé chez cousine, f. ai appris que

Observe that as the number of our Lord's disciples was not limited to two, you cannot translate one another by l'un l'autre, but by les uns

les autres.

both were married.—Honour your father and mother, and étaient mariées. Respectez

endeavour to please both.-Do you speak of my brotáchez de plaire à

6

parlez

ther or sister. I speak of both.-Apples and pears

parle

are

ai écrit

Pomme, f. poire, f. good fruits; but peaches are preferable to both*.—I wrote péches, f. préférable to both; but neither of them has answered my letters.-Yesrépondu à

terday I expected my two best friends; but neither of them

attendais

came. I will give it to neither of them.-Neither of them vinrent. donnerai

has done his dutyt.

devoir, m.

Neither kindness nor
douceur, f.

rigour

rigueur, f. moved him.-Neither of those ladies is my mother.—

ébranlèrent

ces

heard from your nephew and

Have you

reçu des nouvelles de

Reveu

your niece

nièce

since their departure? No, Sir: I correspond with neither depuis

of them.

départ? Non,

IV. EXERCISE ON RULES 10—14, p. 83, 84.

People imagine that, when they are rich, they are On s'imagine que quand

est

happy; but they (are mistaken) very often; for the more heureux; se trompe très-souvent; car one has, the more one wishes to have.-When we are

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(Some persons) reported last week

rapporta dernière2 semaine, f.

* Observe that both apples and pears are in the plural; therefore you must translate to both as if there were to the ones and to the others. † Turn, neither of them have done their duty.

they talk of peace.—We are always humane, charitable, and parle compassionate when we have (acute feelings). compatissant

beaucoup de sensibilité.

- If we

knew how abundant and solid are the consolations savait combien

(32-3)

which religion offers, we should incessantly

que

offre,

that inexhaustible spring. cette intarissable source, f. our beauty, we

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recur to

sans cesse aurait recours When we are admired for

on

(cannot help) being proud (of it.)— ne saurait s'empêcher d'étre flatté en. One is always better at home than elsewhere.-They say chez soi qu' ailleurs.

dit

that the Spaniards have won the last battle.-People think

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queen is ill. People think (they have done every thing)

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IV. EXERCISE ON RULES 15 AND 16, P. 84.

Whatever efforts people make to hide the truth, it effort, m. on fasse pour voiler

(is discovered) sooner or later.-Whatever services

tót ou tard.

you

service, m.

se découvre may have done to your country, it will reward you for them. ayez rendus patrie, f. récompensera en. -Whatever capacity a man may have, he ought not

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to boast. However equitable your offers be*, I do not offre, f. soient,

se vanter.

6

believe they will be accepted.-Though kings be ever so

crois

soient acceptées.

soient

6

This is the construction to be observed in those sentences in which quelque, however, is followed by an adjective. Place quelque first, then the adjective, then que, then the verb, and after it its subject, &c. However equitable that may be your offers, &c.

90

powerful, they die (as well as) the meanest of their puissant,

subjects. sujet, m.

meurent comme

vil

However learned those ladies may be, they

savant

sometimes mistake.—However elegantly he may write, quelquefois se trompent.

his style

is not pleasing.
agréable.

6

écrive,

VI. EXERCISE ON RULE 17, p. 85.

Whatever the enemy

be*

ennemis, m. soient dread, you (ought to rely) devez vous reposer

apprehendez,

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Laws condemn all criminals, whoever they may be.condamnent criminel,

puissent

Whatever your intentions may be, I think that you (are in

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allege), they are not sufficient.-Whatever these books be, alléguiez,

send them to me.

suffisant.

livre

-Whatever her fortune be, he says he fortune, f.

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faites, soyez guidé

probity; and in whatever you say,

the path

(never deviate) from dites, ne vous écartez jamais of truth.—Whatever is pleasing is not always

agréable

sentier, m. useful.-Tell me whatever you think of me, and I (will tell) utile.

Dites

pensez

dirai

*Turn this sentence thus: Whatever be the enemy of whom you dread the malice, &c., and take it as a rule, in all sentences like this, to place the verb immediately after quelque, whatever, and its subject immediately after, &c.

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