Images de page
PDF
ePub

“ part of the wall; but chiefly by the exertions of Cap“ tain Robertson, who, seeing the place was carried, turned " all his attention to preserving order, and preventing the “ unnecessary effusion of blood. To his humanity the “ bukshey and killedar owed their lives; and of the

garrison there were only about forty men killed and « wounded.”

Dr. Robertson's youngest son is Lieutenant-Colonel of a regiment serving in Ceylon, and Deputy-Adjutant General of His Majesty's forces in that island. An account of Ceylon, which he has communicated in manuscript to some of his friends, is said to do great honour to his abilities.

NOTE Q. p. 135. This request was conveyed to Dr. Robertson by Mr. Dal zel, and was received by him with much sensibility, as a mark of the esteem and approbation of a society over which he had presided for thirty years.

I neglected to mention in a former note the Latin discourses which Dr. Robertson pronounced annually before the University, in compliance with the established practice among his predecessors in office. The first of these was read on the third of February 1763. Its object was to recommend the study of classical learning; and it contained, among a variety of other splendid passages, a beautiful panegyric on the Stoical Philosophy. His second discourse (9th of February 1764) consisted chiefly of moral and literary observations, adapted to the particular circumstances of youth. My friend Mr. Dalzel, who has lately perused these Latin manuscripts with care, observes of this oration, “ that the style is uncommonly elegant and “ impressive, and possesses all the distinguishing charac" teristics of Dr. Robertson's English compositions."

A third discourse was pronounced on February 14th, 1765; and a fourth on February 20th, 1766. The sub

ject of both is the same; the question concerning the comparative advantages of public and private education. The execution is such as might be expected from the abilities of the author, exerted on a topic on which he was so. eminently fitted to decide, not only by his professional situation and habits, but by an extensive and discriminating knowledge of the world.

These annual discourses (which never failed to produce a strong and happy impression on the mind of his young hearers) he was compelled, after this period, to discontinue by his avocations as an author, and by other engagements which he conceived to be of still greater importance.It is indeed astonishing that he was able to devote so much time as he did to his academical duties: particularly when we consider that all his works were at first committed to writing in his own hand, and that he seldom, if ever, attempted to dictate to an amanuensis.-It may be gratifying to those to whom the literary habits of authors are an object of curiosity to add, that his practice in composition was (according to his own statement in a letter to Mr. Strahan), “ to finish as near perfection as he was “ able, so that his subsequent alterations were inconsisiderable.”

END OF THE LIFE.

THE

HISTORY

OF

SC O T L A N D

DURING THE REIGNS OF

QUEEN MARY and of King JAMES VI.

TILL

HIS ACCESSION TO THE CROWN OF ENGLAND;

WITH

A REVIEW OF THE SCOTTISH HISTORY PREVIOUS TO THAT PERIOD;

AND AN APPENDIX, CONTAINING ORIGINAL PAPERS.

VOL. I.

1

THE

HISTORY

OF

SCOTLAND.

BOOK I.

fabulous

Containing a Review of the Scottish History

previous to the Death of James V. THE first ages of the Scottish

History are dark B 90 K

. at maturity by degrees, and the events which hap- The origin pened during their infancy or early youth, cannot of nations be recollected, and deserve not to be remembered. and ob The gross ignorance which anciently covered all the scure. north of Europe, the continual migrations of its inhabitants, and the frequent and destructive revolutions which these occasioned, render it impossible to give any authentic account of the origin of the different kingdoms now established there. Every thing beyond that short period to which well-attested annals reach, is obscure; an immense space is left for invention to occupy; each nation, with a vanity inseparable from human nature, hath filled that void with events calculated to display its own antiquity and lustre. History, which ought to record truth

« PrécédentContinuer »