Emma

Couverture
Richard Bentley, 1882 - 419 pages
 

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Avis des utilisateurs

5 étoiles
18
4 étoiles
8
3 étoiles
2
2 étoiles
2
1 étoile
0

Review: Emma

Avis d'utilisateur  - Brittany - Goodreads

Jane Austen's finest. Her language and imagery is vivid and exquisite as always. However, the plot in Emma is so much more extravagant with its twists, turns, and love triangles. It is no wonder that ... Consulter l'avis complet

Review: Emma

Avis d'utilisateur  - Kathryn - Goodreads

This was a book that I thought stood out from all of Jane austen's other novels, though equally accopmlished, this one held a real grasp on me with it's subtle humour and realistic characters. It kept ... Consulter l'avis complet

Pages sélectionnées

Table des matières

I
1
II
9
III
14
IV
19
V
28
VI
33
VII
40
VIII
46
XXIX
210
XXX
218
XXXI
224
XXXII
229
XXXIII
239
XXXIV
247
XXXV
255
XXXVI
261

IX
57
X
70
XI
77
XII
82
XIII
91
XIV
99
XV
105
XVI
113
XVII
118
XVIII
122
XIX
129
XX
136
XXI
143
XXII
153
XXIII
157
XXIV
166
XXV
173
XXVI
179
XXVII
196
XXVIII
204
XXXVII
269
XXXVIII
272
XXXIX
284
XL
288
XLI
294
XLII
302
XLIII
315
XLIV
324
XLV
331
XLVI
338
XLVII
346
XLVIII
358
XLIX
365
L
374
LI
383
LII
389
LIII
398
LIV
406
LV
416

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Expressions et termes fréquents

Fréquemment cités

Page 1 - Emma Woodhouse, handsome, clever and rich, with a comfortable home and happy disposition, seemed to unite some of the best blessings of existence, and had lived nearly twenty-one years in the world with very little to distress or vex her.
Page 309 - The considerable slope, at nearly the foot of which the Abbey stood, gradually acquired a steeper form beyond its grounds; and at half a mile distant was a bank of considerable abruptness and grandeur, well clothed with wood ; and at the bottom of this bank, favourably placed and sheltered, rose the Abbey-Mill Farm, with meadows in front, and the river making a close and handsome curve around it. It was a sweet view — sweet to the eye and the mind. English verdure, English culture, English comfort,...
Page 392 - And when a lady's in the case, You know all other things give place. To leave you thus might seem unkind, But see the Goat is just behind.
Page 17 - ... Smith's conversation, but she found her altogether very engaging— not inconveniently shy, not unwilling to talk— and yet so far from pushing, shewing so proper and becoming a deference, seeming so pleasantly grateful for being admitted to Hartfield, and so artlessly impressed by the appearance of every thing in so superior a style to what she had been used to, that she must have good sense, and deserve encouragement.
Page 17 - This was all that was generally known of her history. She had no visible friends but what had been acquired at Highbury, and was now just returned from a long visit in the country to some young ladies who had been at school there with her. She was a very pretty girl, and her beauty happened to be of a sort which Emma particularly admired. She was short, plump, and fair, with a fine bloom, blue eyes, light hair, regular features, and a look of great sweetness...
Page 319 - Three things very dull indeed.' That will just do for me, you know. I shall be sure to say three dull things as soon as ever I open my mouth, shan't I? — (looking round with the most good-humoured dependence on every body's assent) — Do not you all think I shall?" Emma could not resist. "Ah! ma'am, but there may be a difficulty. Pardon me — but you will be limited as to number — only three at once.
Page 15 - Miss Bates stood in the very worst predicament in the world for having much of the public favour; and she had no intellectual superiority to make atonement to herself, or frighten those who might hate her, into outward respect.
Page 124 - There is one thing, Emma, which a man can always do, if he chuses, and that is, his duty; not by manoeuvring and finessing, but by vigour and resolution.
Page 3 - She dearly loved her father, but he was no companion for her. He could not meet her in conversation, rational or playful. The evil of the actual disparity in their ages (and Mr. Woodhouse had not married early) was much increased by his constitution and habits; for having been a valetudinarian all his life, without activity of mind or body, he was a much older man in ways than in years; and though everywhere beloved for the friendliness of his heart and his amiable temper, his talents could not have...

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