The Life of Hannah More: With Notices of Her Sisters ...

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Carey & Hart, 1838 - 422 pages
 

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Page 195 - Three poets, in three distant ages born, Greece, Italy, and England, did adorn. The first, in loftiness of thought surpassed; The next, in majesty; in both the last. The force of Nature could no further go; To make a third, she joined the former two.
Page 224 - But the wicked are like the troubled sea, when it cannot rest, whose waters cast up mire and dirt.
Page 200 - Verily I say unto you, There is no man that hath left house, or brethren, or sisters, or father, or mother, or wife, or children, or lands, for my sake, and the gospel's, but he shall receive an hundredfold now in this time, houses, and brethren, and sisters, and mothers, and children, and lands, with persecutions; and in the world to come eternal life.
Page 221 - Be ye sure that the Lord he is God : it is he that hath made us, and not we ourselves; we are his people, and the sheep of his pasture.
Page 64 - To whom thus half abash'd Adam replied : Neither her outside form'd so fair, nor aught In procreation common to all kinds, Though higher of the genial bed by far, And with mysterious reverence I deem, So much delights me, as those graceful acts, Those thousand decencies that daily flow From all her words and actions...
Page 112 - For thou art my rock and my fortress; therefore for thy name's sake lead me, and guide me.
Page 67 - ... an artist. It is not merely a creature who can paint, and play, and sing, and draw, and dress, and dance ; it is a being who can comfort and counsel him ; one who can reason, and reflect, and feel, and judge, and discourse and discriminate ; one who can assist him in his affairs, lighten his cares, sooth his sorrows, purify his joys, strengthen his principles, and educate his children.
Page 47 - The steadfast empyrean shook throughout, All but the throne itself of God. Full soon Among them he arrived ; in his right hand Grasping ten thousand thunders, which he sent Before him, such as in their souls infixed Plagues : they, astonished, all resistance lost, All courage ; down their idle weapons dropt: O'er shields, and helms, and helmed heads he rode Of thrones and mighty seraphim prostrate, That wished the mountains now might be again Thrown on them, as a shelter from his ire.
Page 212 - A wit's a feather, and a chief's a rod; An honest man's the noblest work of God.
Page 98 - I had imaged to myself, solemnly devout. I never shall forget the tremulous earnestness with which he pronounced the awful petition in the Litany : " In the hour of death, and in the day of judgment, good LORD deliver us.

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