Henry Ward Beecher

Couverture
Houghton, Mifflin,, 1903 - 457 pages
 

Table des matières

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Expressions et termes fréquents

Fréquemment cités

Page 239 - My paramount object in this struggle is to save the Union, and is not either to save or to destroy slavery.
Page 429 - The authority of the holy Scripture, for which it ought to be believed and obeyed, dependeth not upon the testimony of any man or church, but wholly upon God (who is truth itself), the Author thereof; and therefore it is to be received, because it is the Word of God.
Page 430 - Nevertheless we acknowledge the inward illumination of the Spirit of God to be necessary for the saving understanding of such things as are revealed in the word...
Page 429 - ALTHOUGH the light of nature, and the works of creation and providence, do so far manifest the goodness, wisdom, and power of God, as to leave men inexcusable ;' yet they are not sufficient to give that knowledge of God, and of his will, which is necessary unto salvation...
Page 435 - But now the righteousness of God without the law is manifested, being witnessed by the law and the prophets ; Even the righteousness of God, which is by faith of Jesus Christ unto all, and upon all them that believe...
Page 430 - The whole counsel of God concerning all things necessary for his own glory, man's salvation, faith and life, is either expressly set down in scripture, or by good and necessary consequence may be deduced from scripture ; unto which nothing at any time is to be added, whether by new revelations of the Spirit or traditions of men.
Page 356 - All this came upon the king Nebuchadnezzar. At the end of twelve months he walked in the palace of the kingdom of Babylon. The king spake, and said, Is not this great Babylon, that I have built for the house of the kingdom by the might of my power, and for the honour of my majesty...
Page 116 - The warring gods and formulas of the various religions do indeed cancel each other, but there is a certain uniform deliverance in which religions all appear to meet. It consists of two parts: 1. An uneasiness; and 2. Its solution. 1. The uneasiness, reduced to its simplest terms, is a sense that there is something wrong about us as we naturally stand. 2. The solution is a sense that we are saved from the wrongness by making proper connection with the higher powers.
Page 435 - Now we know that what things soever the law saith, it saith to them who are under the law: that every mouth may be stopped, and all the world may become guilty before God. 20 Therefore by the deeds of the law there shall no flesh be justified in his sight: for by the law is the knowledge of sin.
Page 214 - Let us have faith that right makes might, and in that faith let us to the end dare to do our duty as we understand it.

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