Johnsonian Miscellanies, Volume 2

Couverture
George Birkbeck Norman Hill
At the Clarendon Press, 1897
 

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Page 283 - "No, Sir; there is nothing which has yet been contrived by man, by which so much happiness is produced as by a good tavern or inn." He then repeated, with great emotion, Shenstone's lines :— "Whoe'er has travell'd life's dull round, Where'er his stages may have been, May sigh to think he still has found The warmest welcome at an inn.
Page 180 - People of the same trade,' he writes, 'seldom meet together, even for merriment and diversion, but the conversation ends in a conspiracy against the public, or in some contrivance to raise prices.
Page 317 - but sudden glory arising from some sudden conception of some eminency in ourselves by comparison •with the infirmity of others, or with our own formerly ; for men laugh at the follies of themselves past, when they come suddenly to remembrance, except they bring with them any
Page 372 - Sir, the atrocious crime of being a young man, which the honourable gentleman has with such spirit and decency charged upon me, I shall neither attempt to palliate nor deny, but content myself with wishing that I may be one of those whose follies may cease with their youth, and not of that number who are
Page 495 - such a one and Judge such a one. It is so with physicians (I will not speak of my own trade), soldiers, English, Scotch, French, and the rest. But principally I hate and detest that animal called man, although I heartily love John, Peter, Thomas, and so forth.
Page 477 - to the publick, which I here dare you to refute. Your rage I defy. Your abilities, since your Homer, are not so formidable; and what I hear of your morals inclines me to pay regard, not to what you shall say, but to what you shall prove. You may print this if you will. : SAM. JOHNSON.
Page 296 - O Solitude, romantick maid, Whether by nodding towers you tread ; Or haunt the desert's trackless gloom, Or hover o'er the yawning tomb ; Or climb the Andes' clifted side, Or by the Nile's coy source abide; Or, starting from your half year's sleep, From Hecla view the thawing deep ; Or at the purple dawn of day, Tadmor's marble
Page 110 - the servants obsequious to my call ; anxious to know and ready to supply my wants : wine there exhilarates my spirits, and prompts me to free conversation and an interchange of discourse with those whom I most love : I dogmatise and am contradicted, and in this conflict of opinions and sentiments I find delight
Page 80 - When at table he was totally absorbed in the business of the moment ; his looks seemed rivetted to his plate ; nor would he, unless when in very high company, say one word, or even pay the least attention to what was said by others, till he had satisfied his appetite.
Page 335 - uttered himself again after the same manner, " Dr. Busby, a great man ! he whipped my grandfather ; a very great man ! I should have gone to him myself, if I had not been a blockhead ; a very great man ! "

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