Comfort

Couverture
Fleming H. Revell Company, 1910 - 256 pages
 

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Page 165 - There are thousands of houses in England at this moment where wives, mothers, and children are dying of hunger. Now,' he said, ' when the first paroxysm of your grief is past, I would advise you to come with me and we will never rest till the Corn Law is repealed.
Page 71 - For unto you it is given in the behalf of Christ, not only to believe on him, but also to suffer for his sake ; 30 Having the same conflict "which ye saw in me, and now hear to be in me.
Page 230 - I, even I, am He That comforteth you : who art thou that thou shouldest be afraid of a man that shall die, and of the son of man which shall be made as grass...
Page 130 - Let us rather be thankful that our sorrow lives in us as an indestructible force, only changing its form, as forces do, and passing from pain into sympathy — the one poor word which includes all our best insight and our best love.
Page 113 - It is good for me that I have been afflicted; that I might learn thy statutes.
Page 234 - YES! in the sea of life enisled, With echoing straits between us thrown, Dotting the shoreless watery wild, We mortal millions live alone. The islands feel the enclasping flow, And then their endless bounds they know.
Page 242 - Is it nothing to you, all ye that pass by? behold, and see if there be any sorrow like unto my sorrow, which is done unto me, wherewith the LORD hath afflicted me in the day of his fierce anger.
Page 29 - Now our Lord Jesus Christ himself, and God our Father which loved us and gave us eternal comfort and good hope through grace, comfort your hearts and stablish them in every good work and word.
Page 129 - It would be a poor result of all our anguish and our wrestling, if we won nothing but our old selves at the end of it — if we could return to the same blind loves, the same self-confident blame, the same light thoughts of human suffering, the same frivolous gossip over blighted human lives, the same feeble sense of that Unknown towards which we have sent forth irrepressible cries in our loneliness.
Page 196 - O the anguish of that thought, that we can never atone to our dead for the stinted affection we gave them, for the light answers we returned to their plaints or their pleadings, for the little reverence we showed to that sacred human soul that lived so close to us, and was the diviuest thing God had given us to know...

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