Hudibras: In Three Parts

Couverture
D. Browne, 1761 - 401 pages
 

Avis des internautes - Rédiger un commentaire

Aucun commentaire n'a été trouvé aux emplacements habituels.

Pages sélectionnées

Autres éditions - Tout afficher

Expressions et termes fréquents

Fréquemment cités

Page x - This sword a dagger had, his page, That was but little for his age...
Page ii - He'd run in debt by disputation, And pay with ratiocination : All this by syllogism true, In mood and figure he would do. For rhetoric, he could not ope His mouth, but out there flew a trope : And when he happen'd to break off I' th' middle of his speech, or cough, H...
Page 237 - What makes all doctrines plain and clear? About two hundred pounds a year. And that which was proved true before, Prove false again? Two hundred more.
Page 31 - For he was of that noble trade, That demi-gods and heroes made, Slaughter, and knocking on the head...
Page ii - As if his stock would ne'er be spent : And truly to support that charge, He had supplies as vast and large; For he could coin or counterfeit New words, with little or no wit; Words so debas'd and hard, no stone Was hard enough to touch them on : And when with hasty noise he spoke 'em, The ignorant for current took 'em...
Page 157 - But as a dog that turns the spit Bestirs himself, and plies his feet To climb the wheel, but all in vain, His own weight brings him down again: And still he's in the self-same place Where at his setting out he was...
Page v - For he was of that stubborn crew Of errant saints, whom all men grant To be the true church militant ; Such as do build their faith upon The holy text of pike and gun ; Decide all controversies by Infallible artillery ; And prove their doctrine orthodox By apostolic blows and knocks...
Page 286 - For those that fly may fight again, Which he can never do that's slain. Hence timely running's no mean part Of conduct, in the martial art...
Page i - twixt south and south-west side ; On either which he would dispute, Confute, change hands, and still confute. He'd undertake to prove, by force Of argument, a man's no horse; He'd prove a buzzard is no fowl, And that a lord may be an owl, A calf an alderman, a goose a justice, And rooks committee-men and trustees. He'd run in debt by disputation, And pay with ratiocination. All this by syllogism, true In mood and figure, he would do.

Informations bibliographiques