The Jungle, Volume 1

Couverture
ReadHowYouWant.com, 7 nov. 2008 - 324 pages
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LibraryThing Review

Avis d'utilisateur  - amyolivia - LibraryThing

While the story is not something I was riveted by, the beauty of the language kept me interested. The end of the book got a little preachy, but overall, it was an interesting and eye-opening story. Consulter l'avis complet

LibraryThing Review

Avis d'utilisateur  - CassandraT - www.librarything.com

This book has been very influential to me. But I can't say I "really liked it." Consulter l'avis complet

Table des matières

Chapter 1
1
Chapter 2
33
Chapter 3
50
Chapter 4
70
Chapter 5
90
Chapter 6
108
Chapter 7
124
Chapter 8
142
Chapter 11
186
Chapter 12
202
Chapter 13
214
Chapter 14
227
Chapter 15
239
Chapter 16
262
Chapter 17
277
Chapter 18
296

Chapter 9
155
Chapter 10
170

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Expressions et termes fréquents

À propos de l'auteur (2008)

Upton Sinclair, a lifelong vigorous socialist, first became well known with a powerful muckraking novel, The Jungle, in 1906. Refused by five publishers and finally published by Sinclair himself, it became an immediate bestseller, and inspired a government investigation of the Chicago stockyards, which led to much reform. In 1967 he was invited by President Lyndon Johnson to "witness the signing of the Wholesome Meat Act, which will gradually plug loopholes left by the first Federal meat inspection law" (N.Y. Times), a law Sinclair had helped to bring about. Newspapers, colleges, schools, churches, and industries have all been the subject of a Sinclair attack, analyzing and exposing their evils. Sinclair was not really a novelist, but a fearless and indefatigable journalist-crusader. All his early books are propaganda for his social reforms. When regular publishers boycotted his work, he published himself, usually at a financial loss. His 80 or so books have been translated into 47 languages, and his sales abroad, especially in the former Soviet Union, have been enormous.

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