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France

129–181

Consular immunities; violation of dwelling (at Arcachon) of consul at

Bordeaux by French officials..

129

Lafayette statue; unveiling at Paris, July 4, 1900

456

Presentation of Lafayette memorial coin to the President of France

468

Presentation of Lafayette memorial coin to the French mint..

470

Monument at Vendôme to Marshal Rochambeau

471

Samoan claims of French citizens; admission to arbitration.

473

Rescue by U. S. S. Chicago of French steamship La Bretage..

476

Assistance rendered by French cruiser Protet in extinguishing a fire in San

Francisco Harbor

478

Logs of French torpedo-boat destroyer La Framée

179

Courtesies of French officials at funeral of a landsman belonging to the

U. S. S. Hartford...

480

Condolences on mine explosion in Utah.

481

Condolences on Galveston disaster...

483

Germany.

485-528

Meat inspection in Germany

185

Military-service cases of Herman F. Dietmann, Alfred Knudsen, Joseph

Rinehart, George Rosebrock, John M. Munsch, and Hugo Wagner . 512

Military-service cases of Joseph Gresser, Rudolph Teutsch, Jens Cornelius

Andersen, August Dalesch, George von Staden, Siegfried Zehden, Sieg-

mund Wollenberg, Frederick H. Kruse, and Julius Burger

511

Military-service cases of Peter F. Hinrichsen, Max Abel, F. P. and E. F.

Waggershauser, Albert Ganslen (Gängslen), and Philip Enoch ..

516

Military-service cases of Lawrence M. Metzger, Francis Xavier Hossenlopp,

Albert Ganslen (Gänsslen), Anton Esser, Otto Graul, Fritz Hillens,

Hieronimus Bayer, Simon Moeller, Wilhelm Ritterhoff, and Alired

Knudsen

517

Military-service cases of Herman Karl, Adolph Brück, Heinrich Berns-

mann, and Christian Bodri (Bodry)

519

Extradition between Alsace-Lorraine and the United States is not regu-

lated by treaty

520

Application for passport of Bernard Ehlers, a citizen of the Hawaiian

Islands

520

Marriage between aliens in Prussia; requirement of certificate that no in-

pediment exists ..

521

Samoan claims of French (and other) citizens; admission to arbitration..

522

Offer of use of hospital ship Maine for wounded German soldiers and sailors,

and reciprocal action by German Trained Nurse Association....

Citizenship of children of an alien woman who married an American citi-

zen and brought them to the United States.

526

Condolences on Galveston disaster..

527

Condolences on loss of German training ship Gneisenau at Malaga.

528

Great Britain

529-633

Seizure by British authorities of merchandise of American shippers off the

east coast of Africa, and restitution made on account thereof..

529

Exercise of good offices of United States consul in behalf of British pris-

oners of Boers in South Africa.

619

Award by British Government to Mrs. George F. Labram in recognition

of her husband's services during the siege of Kimberly.

623

Samoan claims of French citizens; admission to arbitration.

625

Courtesies to U.S. F. C. S. Albatross by British deputy commissioner and

vice-consul at Suva Harbor, Fiji Islands

629

Courtesies of British naval officers on occasion of an explosion aboard the

U. S. S. Wheeling, at Hongkong

630

Courtesies extended to an officer of the United States Army by British

forces in South Africa....

631

Condolences on Galveston disaster.

632

Greece

634-617

Military service case of Louis Economopoulos; right of expatriation not

recognized by constitution of Greece.

634

Guatemala and Honduras..

618-705

Claim of Robert H. May v. Guatemala.

648

Murder of Frank Pears in Honduras; payment of indemnity of $10,000.. 674

Consular immunities in connection with judicial summons.

703

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Haiti...

706-714

Jurisdiction over aliens waived by Haitian courts.

706

Condolences on Galveston disaster.

714

Honduras. (See Guatemala and Honduras.)

Italy

715-736

Lynching of persons of Italian origin at Tallulah, La.

715

Courtesies to U.S. S. Dixie

732

Assassination of King Humbert

734

Japan ..

737-768

Alleged discrimination in United States against Japanese, in the matter of

quarantine against bubonic plague..

737

Landing by courtesy of United States troops in Japan

757

Passport application of A. M. Tracey Woodward, born abroad of American

parents, and still residing without the United States ..

758

Income tax, missionaries' salaries held to be subject to payment of

700

Income tax not required of officers and men of United States Navy and

Marine Corps stationed at United States Naval Hospital at Yokohama.. 762

Expressions of sympathy by Emperor and Empress of Japan for sick and

wounded United States soldiers and sailors in Marine Hospital at Yoko-

hama.

767

Condolences on Galveston disaster.

767

Korea

769-777

Right to hold property in Japanese settlements in Korea denied to

Americans.

769

Protection of American interests (Seoul Electric Railroad)

771

Liberia

778-780

Regulation of the importation of spirituous liquors into certain regions

of Africa

778

Mexico...

781-789

Claim of La Abra Silver Mining Company r: Mexico; return to Govern-
ment of Mexico of amount awarded to the company.

781

Claim of Benjamin Weil v. Mexico; return to Government of Mexico of

amount awarded to Weil...

783

Condolences on Galveston disaster; appropriation of $30,000 by Mexican

Congress for relief of sufferers

784

Water Boundary Convention between the United States and Mexico;

extension, for an indefinite period, of the treaty of March 1, 1889. 786

Netherlands

790-802

Organization of the Permanent Court of Arbitration provided for by the

convention signed at the Hague, July 29, 1899...

790

Arbitration of claims of American sealing vessels v. Russia; selection of

Mr. Asser, member of council of state of the Netherlands, to act as

arbitrator..

798

Sicaragua, Salvador, and Costa Rica..

803-835

Customs duties collected by insurgents while in temporary possession of

Bluefields, and return of same to American merchants.

803

Claims of Orr and Laubenheimer and the Post-Glover Electric Company

0. Nicaragua...

824

Paraguay. (See Uruguay and Paraguay.)

Peru

836-844

Extradition treaty with Peru.

836

Condolences on Galveston disaster.

843

Portugal.....

845-849

Arbitration in the matter of the Delagoa Bay Railway; payment by Por-

tugal of amount awarded by arbitrator

845

Russia..

850-886

Arbitration of claims of American sealing and whaling vessels v. Russia;

agreement providing for

850

Salvador. (See Nicaragua, Salvador, and Costa Rica.)

Spain...

887-895

Cession to United States of any and all islands of the Philippine Archi-

pelago lying outside of the lines described in Article III of the treaty of

peace of December 10, 1898

887

Registration of Spanish subjects in the Philippine Islands.

889

Condolences on Galveston disaster.

890

Passports issued by military authorities to citizens of Porto Rico, Cuba,

and the Philippines..

891

MESSAGE.

To the Senate and House of Representatives:

At the outgoing of the old and the incoming of the new century you begin the last session of the Fifty-sixth Congress with evidences on every hand of individual and national prosperity and with proof of the growing strength and increasing power for good of Republican institutions. Your countrymen will join with you in felicitation that American liberty is more firmly established than ever before, and that love for it and the determination to preserve it are more universal than at any former period of our history.

The Republic was never so strong, because never so strongly intrenched in the hearts of the people as now. The Constitution, with few amendments, exists as it left the hands of its authors. The additions which have been made to it proclaim larger freedom and more extended citizenship. Popular government has demonstrated in its one hundred and twenty-four years of trial here its stability and security, and its efficiency as the best instrument of national development and the best safeguard to human rights.

When the Sixth Congress assembled in November, 1800, the population of the United States was 5,308,483. It is now 76,304,799. Then we had sixteen States. Now we have forty-five. Then our territory consisted of 909,050 square miles. It is now 3,846,595 square miles. Education, religion, and morality have kept pace with our advancement in other directions, and while extending its power the Government has adhered to its foundation principles and abated none of them in dealing with our new peoples and possessions. A nation so preserved and blessed gives reverent thanks to God and invokes His guidance and the continuance of His care and favor.

In our foreign intercourse the dominant question has been the treatment of the Chinese problem. Apart from this our relations with the powers have been happy.

The recent troubles in China spring from the antiforeign agitation which for the past three years has gained strength in the northern provinces. Their origin lies deep in the character of the Chinese races and in the traditions of their Government. The Taiping rebellion and the opening of Chinese ports to foreign trade and settlement disturbed alike the homogeneity and the seclusion of China.

Meanwhile foreign activity made itself felt in all quarters, 11ot alone on the coast, but along the great river arteries and in the remoter districts, carrying new ideas and introducing new associations among a primitive people which had pursued for centuries a national policy of isolation.

The telegraph and the railway spreading over their land, the steamers plying on their waterways, the merchant and the missionary penetrating year by year farther to the interior, became to the Chinese mind types of an alien invasion, changing the course of their national life and fraught with vague forebodings of disaster to their beliefs and their self-control.

For several years before the present troubles all the resources of foreign diplomacy, backed by moral demonstrations of the physical force of fleets and arms, have been needed to secure due respect for the treaty rights of foreigners and to obtain satisfaction from the responsible authorities for the sporadic outrages upon the persons and property of unoffending sojourners, which from time to time occurred at widely separated points in the northern provinces, as in the case of the outbreaks in Sze-chuen and Shan-tung.

Posting of antiforeign placards became a daily occurrence, which the repeated reprobation of the Imperial power failed to check or punish. These inflammatory appeals to the ignorance and superstition of the masses, mendacious and absurd in their accusations and deeply hostile in their spirit, could not but work cumulative harm. They aimed at no particular class of foreigners; they were impartial in attacking everything foreign.

An outbreak in Shan-tung, in which German missionaries were slain, was the too natural result of these malevolent teachings. The posting of seditious placards, exhorting to the utter destruction of foreigners and of every foreign thing, continued unrebuked. Hostile demonstrations toward the stranger gained strength by organization.

The sect, commonly styled the Boxers, developed greatly in the provinces north of the Yang-Tse, and with the collusion of many notable officials, including some in the immediate councils of the Throne itself, became alarmingly aggressive. No foreigner's life,

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