Traité sur l'art de faire des armes ...

Couverture
The Author, 1830 - 60 pages
 

Avis des internautes - Rédiger un commentaire

Aucun commentaire n'a été trouvé aux emplacements habituels.

Pages sélectionnées

Table des matières

Autres éditions - Tout afficher

Expressions et termes fréquents

Fréquemment cités

Page iii - ... shoulders, are placed in positions the most beneficial to health. The various motions also of the arms and limbs, whilst the body maintains its erect position, enable the muscles in general to acquire both strength and tone ; and in young people, the bones of the chest, or thorax, necessarily become more enlarged, by means of which a consumptive tendency may be avoided.
Page iv - ... motions of the arms and limbs, whilst the body maintains its erect position, enable the muscles in general to acquire vigorous strength, and in young people the bones of the chest and thorax necessarily become more enlarged, by means of which a consumptive tendency may be often prevented. It has been remarked, also, that those who practise the art are remarkable for long life and the good health they enjoy. These considerations, combined with the graceful movements which it establishes, ami the...
Page iv - Fencing, says Locke on Education, ' is so necessary a qualification in the breeding of a gentleman, and has so many advantages in regard to health and personal appearance, tha FENCING. gentleman of respectability ought to have •o striking a mark of distinction.
Page vi - London, so well disposed by nature, and so properly attentive to make yourself genteel in person, and well-bred in behaviour. I am very glad you have taken a fencing-master : that exercise will give you some manly, firm, and graceful attitudes : open your chest, place your head upright, and plant you well upon your legs. As to the use of the sword, it is well to know it: but remember my dearest nephew, it is a science of defence : and that a sword can never be employed by the hand of a man of virtue,...
Page iv - FENCING has prevented consumption and other disorders. It has been remarked, also, that those who practise this art are, in general, remarkable for long life and the good health they have enjoyed. These considerations, combined with. the graceful movements which it establishes, and the elegant means of self-defence which it furnishes, certainly render the art an object of considerable import...
Page iii - Fencing.—There is no exercise, with a view to health, better entitled to the attention of those who are placed among the higher classes of society, than that of fencing. The positions of the body in fencing, have, for their...
Page iv - The various motions of the arms and limbs, whilst the body maintains its erect position, enables the muscles, in general, to acquire vigorous strength; and, in young people, the bones of the chest and thorax necessarily become more enlarged, by means of which a consumptive tendency may be prevented. Various instances may be adduced where FENCING has prevented consumption and other disorders.
Page 8 - ... de manière que, le genou droit soit perpendiculaire à la boucle > du soulier.

Informations bibliographiques