Institutiones linguae pracriticae

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Koenig et van Borcharen, 1837 - 581 pages
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Page 487 - ... applicable to the, first and second persons conjointly — the conjugation of the affirmative verb — the existence of a negative aorist, a negative imperative and other negative forms in the verb — the union of the neuter and feminine genders in the singular, and of the masculine and feminine genders in the plural, of the pronouns and verbs — and the whole body of the syntax, are entirely unconnected with the Sanscrit; while the Tamil and Karnataca scholar will at once recognize their radical...
Page 11 - Bheels were regarded both by him and the other officers with whom I conversed, as unquestionably the original inhabitants of the country, and driven to their present fastnesses and their present miserable way of life by the invasion of those tribes, wherever they may have come from, who profess the religion of Brahma. This...
Page 486 - ... form a distinct family of languages, with which the Sanscrit has, in latter times especially, intermixed, but with which it has no radical connexion.
Page 486 - It is the intent of the following observations to shew that the statements contained in the preceding quotations are not correct; that neither the Tamil, the Telugu, nor any of their cognate dialects are derivations from the Sanscrit...
Page 487 - India should in this respect bear any resemblance to the Hindus of the south; it is, nevertheless, the fact, that, if not of the same radical derivation, the language of the mountaineers of Rajmahal abounds in terms common to the Tamil and Telugu.
Page 487 - This language is the vernacular dialect of the Hindoos inhabiting that part of the Indian Peninsula, which, extending from the Dutch settlement of Pulicat, on the coast of Coromandel, inland to the vicinity of Bangalore, stretches northwards along the coast as far as Chicacole ; and in the interior, to the sources of the Tapti, bounded on the east by the Bay of Bengal ; and on the west by an irregular line passing through the western districts belonging to the Soubahdar...
Page 9 - They are nevertheless mutually unintelligible, and are so fardifferent languages ; the Hindi retaining its own or Sanscrit words, the Hindustani in every possible case substituting for them words of Persian and Arabic origin. Although therefore the frame work is nearly unchanged, it is filled up in a wholly various matter, and for all the ordinary purposes of speech the dialects are distinct, whatever may be their original identity. The Hindi again varies probably in every hundred square miles, and...
Page 486 - Sanscrit (GrandonicoMalabarica) and common Malayalam, though the former differs from the latter only in introducing Sanscrit terms and forms in unrestrained profusion, and the Tuluva, the native speech of that part of the country to which in our maps the name of Canara is confined.
Page 1 - Keerpoy (officially termed the Jungle Mehals) probably speak the language of the Bengal province quite correct and unmixed. To the westward the Gond and Ooria languages pass into each other on the estate of Sonepur, the Raja of which country informed me that half his people speak one and half the other dialect. On the south we find the first traces of the Telinga about Ganjam, where a different pronunciation may be observed. The people there call themselves Oodiahs and Wodiahs, instead of Oorias,...
Page 488 - Palatchi, and Palgaut ; and sweeping to the NW skirts the edges of the precipitous western Ghauts, nearly as far north as the sources of the Kistna; whence following first an eastern and afterwards a north-eastern course, it terminates in rather an acute angle near Beder, already described as its northern limit...

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