Pocket Dictionary of the Scottish Idiom: In which the Significance of the Words is Given in English and German, Chiefly Calculated to Promote the Understanding of the Works of Sir Walter Scott, Rob. Burns, and Allan Ramsay &c., with an Appendix Containing Notes Explicative of Scottish Customs, Manners, Traditions &c

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Brothers Borntraeger, 1826
 

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Page 220 - This charm must likewise be performed unperceived and alone. You go to the barn, and open both doors, taking them off the hinges, if possible; for there is danger, that the being about to appear, may shut the doors, and do you some mischief. Then take that instrument used
Page 221 - lands meet'* and dip your left shirt sleeve. Go to bed in sight of a fire, and hang your wet sleeve before it to dry. Lie awake, and some time near midnight, an apparition having the exact figure of the grand object in question, will come and turn the sleeve, as if to dry the other side of it.
Page 220 - Burning the nuts is a favourite charm. They name the lad and lass to each particular nut, as they lay them in the fire, and accordingly as they burn quietly together, or start from beside one another, the course and issue of the courtship -will be. 4.
Page 219 - that is, the heart of the stem, is indicative of the natural temper or disposition. Lastly, the stems, or to give them their ordinary appellation, the runts, are placed somewhere above the head of the door; and the Christian names of the people ■whom chance brings into the house, are, according to the priority of placing the runts, the names in question.
Page 222 - The Whistle. In the train of Anne of Denmark, ■when she came to Scotland with our James the Sixth, there came over also a Danish Gentleman of gigantic stature and great prowess, and a matchless champion of Bacchus. He had a little ebony whistle, which, at
Page 219 - This is thought to be a night when ■witches, devils and other mischief-making beings, are all abroad on their baneful midnight errands ; particularly those aerial people, the Fairies, are said on that night to hold a grand anniversary. The
Page 219 - at three several times, a stalk of oats. If the third stalk wants the top-pickle, that is, the grain at the top of the stalk, the party in question will come to the marriage-bed any thing but a maid.
Page 221 - our country dialect we call a wecht, and go through all the attitudes of letting down corn against the wind. Repeat it three times; and the third time an apparition will pass through the barn, in at the windy door, and out at the other, having both the figure in question, and the appearance or retinue, marking the employment or station in life. 11.
Page 220 - a clue of blue yarn; -wind it in a new clue off the old one; and towards the latter end, something will hold the thread; demand: wha hauds? ie -who holds? an answer will be returned from the kiln-pot, by naming
Page 220 - blue-due. Whoever -would with success try this spell, must strictly observe these directions: Steal out, all alone, to the kiln, and, darkling, throw into the pot a clue of blue yarn; -wind it in a new clue off the old one; and towards the latter end, something will hold the thread; demand: wha hauds? ie -who holds? an answer will be returned from the kiln-pot, by naming

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