Television, Power, and the Public in Russia

Couverture
Cambridge University Press, 20 mars 2008
The Russian media are widely seen to be increasingly controlled by the government. Leaders buy up dissenting television channels and pour money in as fast as it haemorrhages out. As a result, TV news has become narrower in scope and in the range of viewpoints which it reflects: leaders demand assimilation and shut down dissenting stations. Using original and extensive focus group research and new developments in cognitive theory, Ellen Mickiewicz unveils a profound mismatch between the complacent assumption of Russian leaders that the country will absorb their messages, and the viewers on the other side of the screen. This is the first book to reveal what the Russian audience really thinks of its news and the mental strategies they use to process it. The focus on ordinary people, rather than elites, makes a strong contribution to the study of post-communist societies and the individual's relationship to the media.
 

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Pages sélectionnées

Table des matières

The missing term in the equation
1
Detecting channels
41
Election news and angry viewers
60
Excavating concealed tradeoffs
96
Russian memories
128
Endings
155
The other side of the screen
178
Index
207
Droits d'auteur

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Fréquemment cités

Page i - Professor of Public Policy Studies in the Terry Sanford Institute of Public Policy and Professor of Political Science at Duke University.

À propos de l'auteur (2008)

Ellen Mickiewicz is James R. Shepley Professor of Public Policy Studies in the Sanford Institute for Public Policy and Professor of Political Science at Duke University. She is a leading authority on Russian news media, and her previous publications include Changing Channels: Television and the Struggle for Power in Russia (1997) and Split Signals: Television and Politics in the Soviet Union (1988).

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