Software Studies: A Lexicon

Couverture
Matthew Fuller, David Gee Reader in Digital Media Matthew Fuller
MIT Press, 2008 - 334 pages

This collection of short expository, critical, and speculative texts offers a fieldguide to the cultural, political, social, and aesthetic impact of software. Computing and digitalmedia are essential to the way we work and live, and much has been said about their influence. Butthe very material of software has often been left invisible. In Software Studies, computerscientists, artists, designers, cultural theorists, programmers, and others from a range ofdisciplines each take on a key topic in the understanding of software and the work that surroundsit. These include algorithms; logical structures; ways of thinking and doing that leak out of thedomain of logic and into everyday life; the value and aesthetic judgments built into computing;programming's own subcultures; and the tightly formulated building blocks that work to make, name,multiply, control, and interweave reality. The growing importance of software requires a new kind ofcultural theory that can understand the politics of pixels or the poetry of a loop and engage in themicroanalysis of everyday digital objects. The contributors to Software Studies are both literate incomputing (and involved in some way in the production of software) and active in making andtheorizing culture. Software Studies offers not only studies of software but proposes an agenda fora discipline that sees software as an object of study from new perspectives. ContributorsAlisonAdam, Wilfried Hou Je Bek, Morten Breinbjerg, Ted Byfield, Wendy Hui Kyong Chun, Geoff Cox, FlorianCramer, Cecile Crutzen, Marco Deseriis, Ron Eglash, Matthew Fuller, Andrew Goffey, Steve Goodman,Olga Goriunova, Graham Harwood, Friedrich Kittler, Erna Kotkamp, Joasia Krysa, Adrian Mackenzie, LevManovich, Michael Mateas, Nick Montfort, Michael Murtaugh, Jussi Parikka, Søren Pold, DerekRobinson, Warren Sack, Grzesiek Sedek, Alexei Shulgin, Matti Tedre, Adrian Ward, Richard Wright,Simon Yuill

Matthew Fuller is David Gee Reader in Digital Media at the Centre forCultural Studies, Goldsmiths College, University of London. He is the author of Media Ecologies:Materialist Energies in Art and Technoculture (MIT Press, 2005) and Behind the Blip: Essays on theCulture of Software.

 

Avis des internautes - Rédiger un commentaire

Aucun commentaire n'a été trouvé aux emplacements habituels.

Table des matières

Introduction
1
Algorithm
15
Analog
21
Button
31
Class Library
37
Code
40
Codecs
48
Computing Power
55
Language
168
Lists
174
Loop
179
Memory
184
Obfuscated Code
193
Object Orientation
200
Perl
207
Pixel
213

Concurrent Versions System
64
Copy
70
Data Visualization
78
Elegance
87
Ethnocomputing
92
Function
101
Glitch
110
Import Export
119
Information
125
Intelligence
132
Interaction
143
Interface
149
Internationalization
153
Interrupt
161
Preferences
218
Programmability
224
Sonic Algorithm
229
Source Code
236
System Event Sounds
243
Text Virus
250
Timeline sonic
256
Variable
260
Weird Languages
267
Bibliography
277
About the Contributors
313
Index
321
Droits d'auteur

Autres éditions - Tout afficher

Expressions et termes fréquents

À propos de l'auteur (2008)

Matthew Fuller is Professor of Cultural Studies at the Digital Culture Unit, Centre for Cultural Studies, Goldsmiths, University of London. He is the author of Media Ecologies: Materialist Energies in Art and Technoculture (MIT Press), Software Studies (MIT Press), and, with Andrew Goffey, of Evil Media (MIT Press) as well as Behind the Blip: Essays on the Culture of Software and other books.

Matthew Fuller is Professor of Cultural Studies at the Digital Culture Unit, Centre for Cultural Studies, Goldsmiths, University of London. He is the author of Media Ecologies: Materialist Energies in Art and Technoculture (MIT Press), Software Studies (MIT Press), and, with Andrew Goffey, of Evil Media (MIT Press) as well as Behind the Blip: Essays on the Culture of Software and other books.

Informations bibliographiques