Armenian Popular Songs

Couverture
S. Lazarus, 1852 - 85 pages
 

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Page 62 - ... lament to thee, I will tell thee my thousand sorrows, The sorrows of my heart, the thousand sorrows. Stork, when thou didst go away, When thou didst go away from our tree, Withering winds did blow, They dried up our smiling flowers. The brilliant sky was obscured, That brilliant sky was cloudy; From above they were breaking the snow in pieces; Winter approached, the destroyer of flowers. Beginning from the rock of Varaca, Beginning from that rock of Varaca, The snow descended and covered all,...
Page 16 - There is the sky, but the earth is not seen; There is the earth, but the sun is not seen; The waves come like mountains, And open before me a deep abyss. 0 sea, if thou lovest thy God, Have pity on me forlorn and wretched; Take not from me my sweet sun, And betray me not to flinty-hearted death. Pity, O sea, O terrible sea! Give me not up to the cold winds; My tears implore thee, And the thousand sorrows of my heart.
Page 58 - Ah! pretty, pretty, Ah ! dear little partridge ! When the little partridge descends from the tree, And with his sweet voice chirps, He cheers all the world, He draws the heart from the sea of blood. Ah ! pretty, pretty, Ah ! dear little partridge ! All the birds call thee blessed, They come with thee in flocks, They come around thee chirping; In truth there is not one like thee. Ah! pretty, pretty, Ah! beautiful little partridge!
Page 62 - Down from yon distant mountain The water flows through the village, Ha! A dark boy comes forth, And washing his hands and face, Washing, yes washing, And turning to the water, asked, Ha! Water, from what mountain dost thou come? 0 my cool and sweet water! Ha! I came from that mountain, Where the old and new snow lie one on the other.
Page 72 - ... I have accepted for thee this solitary life, And thou dost not send me rations, My ankles are sore, my knees are sore. In the morning at daylight they go to the chase ; They caught a sheep, a lamb, and a ram ; They made the wolf the pious economist. Unjust judge, unjust economist, unjust ! The wolf had made a portion for the bear of the ewe, And ordered the lamb for the poor monk : The ram for me, says he, for I have walked much. Unjust judge, unjust economist, unjust ! The bear had raised his...
Page 60 - Thou stork, welcome! Thou hast brought us the sign of spring, Thou hast made our heart gay. Descend, O stork! Descend, O stork, upon our roof, Make thy nest upon our ash tree, Thou our dear one. Stork, I lament to thee; Yes, O stork, I lament to thee, I will tell thee my thousand sorrows, The sorrows of my heart, the thousand sorrows. Stork, when thou didst go away, When thou didst go away from our tree, Withering winds did blow, They dried up our smiling flowers.
Page 30 - The falcon Death seized My dear and sweet-voiced turtle dove and wounded me. They took my sweet-toned little lark And flew away through the skies! Before my eyes they sent the hail On my flowering green...
Page 74 - ON A LITTLE KNIFE LOST. My heart trembled in my breast from fear; From fear my heart was powerless: What shall I answer my papa, For I have lost my little knife ? It was strong and sounding, With a single stroke it cut through a large cucumber; I did not sleep out in the village of others And I did not take it from my bosom in the houses of others. My knife had good manners: It remained with me all day without being tied. They made me drunk, they deceived me And they seized it. My knife gave me advice,...
Page 48 - Eun not to thy flock, thou wilt arrive soon enough : Crane, hast thou not news from our country ? I have left my possessions and vineyard, and I have come hither; How often do I sigh, it seems that my soul is torn from me ; Crane, stay a little, thy voice is in my soul : Crane, hast thou not news...

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