Grammatical Notices of the Asamese Language

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Printed at the American Baptist Mission Press, 1848 - 80 pages
 

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Page 16 - Elder sister Younger sister Elder brother's wife Younger brother's wife Elder sister's husband Younger sister's husband...
Page iv - ... Introduction to his Grammatical Notes on the Assamese Language, in 1846; "The Assamese is often regarded as merely a corrupt form of the Bengali, by persons who become acquainted with that language previous to their arrival in Assam. Finding so large a proportion of words common to Bengali and Assamese, and not considering that this similarity necessarily results from the derivation of these languages from Sanskrit, the common parent of both, it has been hastily concluded that the Assamese is...
Page iii - Sanskrit, or whether it was -formed by engrafting the Sanskrit upon some original native stock now extinct, is uncertain ; the latter however, is the more probable opinion. With what languages this original stock may have been affiliated, is an interesting, but difficult inquiry; as but very few...
Page iv - ... language previous to their arrival in Assam. Finding so large a proportion of words common to Bengali and Assamese, and not considering that this similarity necessarily results from the derivation of these languages from Sanskrit, the common parent of both, it has been hastily concluded that the Assamese is but an uncouth jargon, formed by the incorporation of Bengali with the various dialects of the country. The opinion that the present language of Bengali is the parent of Assamese is irreconcilable...
Page iv - Most probably, Dr. Nathan Brown was the first grammarian to dismiss this idea that Assamese could be a dialect of Bengali. He ,wrote in the Introduction to his Grammatical Notes on the Assamese Language, in 1846; "The Assamese is often regarded as merely a corrupt form of the Bengali, by persons who become acquainted with that language previous to their arrival in Assam. Finding so large a proportion of words common to Bengali and Assamese, and not considering that this similarity necessarily results...
Page 31 - It does not correspond to the infinitive in English; nor is it to be confounded with the participle, since it partakes of the nature neither of a noun or an adjective. It may be translated either by the present participle, or the simple verb, followed by the conjunction and; as fa sjfauTt srTftw, he shooting killed it; or, he shot and killed it.
Page iii - The author vindicates the use of a single s in Asam and Asamese on the ground that it is single in the original ; as also by the usage of
Page ix - The orthography of this work was found to correspond much better with the actual pronunciation than any other that had been met...
Page iv - ... examined- The names of common and familiar objects are those which longest resist the encroachments of a foreign tongue; and a further cora...
Page iv - Siamese, is now understood only by a few Ahom priests, who still preserve their old religion. The...

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