Henry More: And the Scientific Revolution

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Cambridge University Press, 30 avr. 2002 - 320 pages
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Henry More (1614-87) was the greatest English metaphysical theologian and the most perplexing; he was also perhaps the most distinguished member of the group of divines known as the Cambridge Platonists. An admirer of Galileo, Descartes and Boyle, he rejected their detailed applications of mechanical philosophy to the explanation of natural phenomena. He was an experimenter, yet also a cabalist, and one of the few writers whom Newton acknowledged as having influenced his ideas. First published in 1990, this thorough and accessible biography is the first book-length treatment of this remarkable character. Hall illuminates More's important contributions to science, particularly his work on space and time which influenced Newton, and gives fascinating insights into his spiritual philosophy and his preoccupation with witchcraft. The depth of Professor Hall's scholarship makes the book an exceptional account of the turbulent world of the Scientific Revolution.
 

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Table des matières

Introduction
3
Platonism
11
Platonism and the Scientific Revolution
40
The Cambridge Platonists
58
Henry More Man of Paradox
82
For and Against the Scientific Revolution
105
Henry Mores Philosophy
107
The Spirit World
128
Space and Time
202
Force
224
Conclusion
242
The Chief Philosophical Writings of Henry More
273
More and Galileo 1647
275
Mores Books and the Fellows of the Royal Society
277
Notes
279
Bibliography
289

More and Descartes
146
More and the Royal Society
168

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