An address delivered in King's college, London, introductory to a course of lectures on the languages and literature of Asia

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Parbury, Allen and Company Leadenhall Street, and Fellowes, Ludgate Hill, 1835 - 67 pages
 

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Page 51 - SWEET maid, if thou would'st charm my sight, And bid these arms thy neck infold ; That rosy cheek, that lily hand, • Would give thy poet more delight Than all Bocara's vaunted gold, Than all the gems of Samarcand.
Page 44 - While sparkling cups delight our eyes, Be gay; and scorn the frowns of age. What cruel answer have I heard ! And yet, by heaven, I love thee still: Can aught be cruel from thy lip ? Yet say, how fell that bitter word From lips which streams of sweetness fill, Which...
Page 13 - In Arabia, as well as in Greece, the perfection of language outstripped the refinement of manners ; and her speech could diversify the fourscore names of honey, the two hundred of a serpent, the five hundred of a lion, the thousand of a sword, at a time when this copious dictionary was intrusted to the memory of an illiterate people.
Page 24 - They shall be abundantly satisfied with the fatness of thy house; and thou shalt make them drink of the river of thy pleasures. For with thee is the fountain of life: in thy light shall we see light.
Page 59 - In a country so remote from /399/ all connection with European Artists, he has been obliged to charge himself with all the various occupations of the Metallurgist, the Engraver, the Founder and the Printer. To the merit of invention, he was compelled to add the application of personal labour. With a rapidity unknown in Europe, he surmounted all the obstacles which necessarily clog the first rudiments of a difficult art, as well as the disadvantages of solitary experiment...
Page 27 - SELF is that conscious, thinking thing, which is sensible or conscious of pleasure and pain, capable of happiness or misery, and so is concerned for itself as far as that consciousness extends.
Page 59 - European artists, he has been obliged to charge himself with all the various occupations of the Metallurgist, the Engraver, the Founder, and the Printer. To the merit of invention he was compelled to add the application of personal labour. With a rapidity unknown in Europe, he surmounted all the obstacles which necessarily clog the first rudiments of a difficult art, as well as the disadvantages of solitary experiment ; and has thus singly on the first effort exhibited his work in a state of perfection...
Page 59 - Governor-General prevailed upon Mr. Wilkins, a gentleman who has been some years in the India Company's Civil Service in Bengal, to undertake a set of Bengali types.
Page 65 - Spain introduced the gallant custom of serenading their mistresses, on which occasion, not only the words of their songs, but the airs, and even the colour of their habits, were expressive of the triumph of the fortunate, or the despair of the rejected lover. The Kitar — whence our guitar, from the Spanish guitarra — was their favourite instrument. — Richardson. The idea expressed in the first stanza of this serenade — the comparison of the eye of his sleeping mistress to a sheathed sword...
Page 22 - Arabic tongue is blended with the Persian in so singular a manner, that one period often contains both languages, wholly distinct from each other in expression and idiom, but perfectly united in sense and construction.

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