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Page 58 - Of praise a mere glutton, he swallowed what came, And the puff of a dunce, he mistook it for fame; Till his relish grown callous, almost to disease, Who peppered the highest was surest to please. But let us be candid, and speak out our mind, If dunces applauded, he paid them in kind.
Page 91 - I have a short and plain answer: let him study the Holy Scripture, especially the New Testament; therein are contained the words of eternal life : it has God for its author, Salvation for its end, and Truth, without any mixture of error, for its matter...
Page 24 - ... a custom loathsome to the eye, hateful to the nose, harmful to the brain, dangerous to the lungs, and in the black stinking fume thereof, nearest resembling the horrible Stygian smoke of the pit that is bottomless.
Page 30 - Forsake not an old friend, for the new is not comparable to him : a new friend is as new wine ; when it is old thou shalt drink it with pleasure.
Page 24 - It is a custom loathsome to the eye, hateful to the nose, harmful to the brain, dangerous to the lungs, and in the black .... fume thereof, nearest resembling the horrible Stygian smoke of the pit that is bottomless.
Page 90 - The influence of religion, however, aided and supported me. I reflected that no human prudence or foresight could possibly have averted my present sufferings. I was indeed a stranger in a strange land, yet I was still under the protecting eye of that Providence who has condescended to call himself the Stranger's Friend.
Page 53 - and so I doubt not but it would be to a waking man, if it were possible for him to keep only one idea in his mind, without variation, and the succession of others ; and we see, that one who fixes his thoughts very intently on one thing, so as to take but little notice of the succession of ideas that pass in his mind whilst he is taken up with that earnest contemplation, lets slip out of his account a good part of that duration, and thinks that time shorter than it is.
Page 39 - I have lived," said Dr. Adam Clarke, " long enough to know that the great secret of human happiness is this : never suffer your energies to stagnate. The old adage of " too many irons in the fire,
Page 30 - A faithful friend is a strong defence; and he that hath found such an one, hath found a treasure.
Page 91 - I cannot refrain from adding,' says he, 'that the collection of tracts, which we call from their excellence the Scriptures, contain, independently of a divine origin, more true sublimity, more exquisite beauty, purer morality, more important history, and finer strains both of poetry and eloquence, than could be collected within the same compass, from all the other books that were ever composed in any age or in any idiom.

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