A Journey Through Albania and Other Provinces of Turkey in Europe and Asia, to Constantinople, During the Years 1809 and 1810, Volume 1

Couverture
M. Carey, 1817 - 440 pages

A Journey Through Albania, And Other Provinces of Turkey in Europe and Asia, To Constantinople by Baron John Cam Hobhouse Broughton, first published in 1817, is a rare manuscript, the original residing in one of the great libraries of the world. This book is a reproduction of that original, which has been scanned and cleaned by state-of-the-art publishing tools for better readability and enhanced appreciation.

Restoration Editors' mission is to bring long out of print manuscripts back to life. Some smudges, annotations or unclear text may still exist, due to permanent damage to the original work. We believe the literary significance of the text justifies offering this reproduction, allowing a new generation to appreciate it.

 

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Page 426 - With hallow'd ruins ; when the muse's haunt, The marble porch where wisdom wont to talk With SOCRATES or TULLY, hears no more, Save the hoarse jargon of contentious monks, Or female superstition's midnight prayer; When...
Page 411 - When the child is born, it is immediately laid in the cradle and loaded with amulets ; and a small bit of soft mud, well steeped in a jar of water, properly prepared by previous charms, is stuck upon its forehead, to obviate the effects of the evil eye...
Page 103 - A\i did not ask us any questions that betrayed his ignorance. His liveliness and ease gave us very favourable impressions of his natural capacity. In the evening of the next day we paid the Vizier another visit, in an apartment more elegantly furnished than the one with the fountain. Whilst we were with him a messenger came in from Berat, the place which Ali's army (of about five thousand men) was then besieging.
Page 102 - Vizier was a short man, about five feet five inches in height, and very fat, though not particularly corpulent. He had a very pleasing face, fair and round, with, hlue quick eyes, not at all settled into a Turkish gravity. His beard was long and white, and such a one as any other Turk would have been proud of; though he, who was more taken up with his guests than himself, did not continue looking at it, nor smelling and stroking it, as is usually the custom of his countrymen, to fill up the pauses...
Page 130 - Byron, observed that the men had 'rather a contempt and even aversion for their females, and there is nothing in any of their occasional inclinations which can be said to partake of what we call the tender passion. In short, their habit of life . . . appears to render them quite independent of the other sex, whom they never mention nor seem to miss in their usual concerns or amusements. The same habit is productive of a system which is carried by them to an extent of which no nation, perhaps, either...
Page 131 - These people, living between Christians and Mahometans, and not being skilled in controversy, declare, that they are utterly unable to judge which religion is best; but, to be certain of not entirely rejecting the truth, they very prudently follow both. They go to the...
Page 208 - ... concealed from view by a shed, which it supports. The stone is brown, rough, and ordinary, probably that of Parnassus. On the south side are many inscriptions, with wide gaps between the letters, which are negligently and faintly cut ; all nearly of the same tenor, and very difficult to copy. They register the purchase of slaves, who had entrusted the price of their freedom to the god ; containing the contract between Apollo and their owners, witnessed by his priests and by some of the archons....
Page 131 - Sundays, saying for their excuse, that at the day of judgment they are sure of protection from the true prophet; but which that is, they are not able to determine in this world.
Page 126 - ... enemy. In many parts of the country the sowing and reaping of the harvest is delegated to the women, the old and the infirm; and only those labours which require the strength and skill of man, such as the felling of timber, and the cultivation of the vineyard, fall to the lot of the young mountaineer.
Page 403 - Their stature is above the middling size, 404 and their make muscular but not brawny, round and well filled out but not inclined to corpulency. Both the face and the form of the women are very inferior to those of the men. Though they have the same kind of features, their eyes are too languid* and their complexions too pale, and, even from the age of twelve, they have a flaccidity and looseness of person which is far from agreeable.

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