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ARTICLE XIII.

It shall be free for the subjects of Her Britannic Majesty residing in the dominions of the King of Greece, and for the subjects of His Majesty the King of Greece residing in the dominions of Her Britannic Majesty, to dispose of their property, of every description, by will or testament, as they may judge fit; and if any British subjects shall die in the territories of the King of Greece, or any Greek subject shall die in the territories of the Queen of Great Britain, without will or testament, the respective Consuls or ViceConsuls shall exercise the right of administering to the property of subjects of their nation so dying intestate, for the benefit of the legitimate heirs to such property, and of the creditors upon the estate, so far as the laws of the respective countries shall admit,

Appendix No. 94.
Greece.

GUATEMALA.-February 20, 1849.

ARTICLE IX.

If any subject or citizen of either of the two High Contracting Parties shall die without will or testament in any of the territories, dominions, or settlements of the other, the Consul-General or Consul of the nation to which the deceased belonged, or the representative of such Consul-General or Consul, in his absence, shall have the right to nominate curators to take charge of the property of the deceased, so far as the laws of the country will permit, for the benefit of the lawful heirs and creditors of the deceased; giving proper notice of such nomination to the authorities of the country.

ARTICLE XI.

It shall be free for each of the two High Contracting Parties to appoint Consuls for the protection of trade, to reside in any of the territories, dominions and settlements of the other party; but before any Consul shall act as such, he shall, in the usual form, be approved and admitted by the Government to which he is sent; and either of the High Contracting Parties may except from the residence of Consuls such particular places as they judge fit to be excepted. The Guatemalan Diplomatic Agents and Consuls shall enjoy, in the territories, dominions, and settlements of Her Britannic Majesty whatever privileges, exceptions, and immunities are or shall be granted to the agents of the same rank belonging to the most favoured nation; and in like manner, the Diplomatic Agents and Consuls of Her Britannic Majesty in the Guatemalan territories shall enjoy, according to the strictest reciprocity, whatever privileges, exceptions, and immunities are or may be granted in the territories of the Republic of Guatemala, to the Diplomatic Agents and Consuls of the most favoured nation.

HONDURAS.-August 27, 1856,

ARTICLE XI.

If any ship of war or merchant vessel of either of the High Contracting Parties should be wrecked on the coasts of the other, such ship or vessel, or any parts thereof, and all furniture and appurtenances belonging thereunto, and all goods and merchandize which shall be saved therefrom, or the proceeds thereof, if sold, shall be faithfully restored to the owners, upon being claimed by them or by their duly authorized agents; and if there are no such owners or agents on the spot, then the said ships or parts of ships, furniture, appurtenances, goods, and merchandize, or the proceeds thereof, if, sold, as well as all the papers found on board such wrecked ship or vessel, shall be delivered to the British Consul or Vice-Consul, or to the Consul or Vice-Consul of the Republic of Honduras, in whose district the wreck may have taken place, upon being claimed by him; and upon payment by such Consul, Vice-Consul, owners, or agents, of only the expenses incurred in the preservation of the property, and of the salvage or other expenses which would have been payable in the like case of a wreck of a national vessel.

Appendix No. 95.
Guatemala.

Appendix No. 96.

Honduras.

Honduras.

Appendix No. 96. The charge for such salvage or other expenses shall be made and settled immediately, subject to such right of appeal on the part of the person paying the same as may exist in the respective countries. The goods and merchandize saved from the wreck shall not be subject to duties, unless cleared for consumption; in which case they shall be liable only to the same duties as if they had been imported in a national vessel.

ARTICLE XIV.

In the event of any subject or citizen of either of the two Contracting Parties dying without will or testament in the dominions or territories of the other Contracting Party, or in the absence of lawful heirs or representatives, the Consul-General, Consul, or Acting Consul of the nation to which the deceased may belong, shall, so far as the laws of each country will permit, have the right to take possession and charge of the property which the deceased may have left, for the benefit of his lawful heirs and creditors, giving immediate notice of the death to the authorities of the country.

ARTICLE XVI.

It is agreed and covenanted that neither of the High Contracting Parties shall knowingly receive into or retain in its service any subjects or citizens of the other party who have deserted from the naval or military service of that other party; but that, on the contrary, each of the Contracting Parties shall respectively discharge from its service any such deserters upon being required by the other party so to do.

And it is further agreed, that if any of the crew of any merchant vessel of either Contracting Party shall desert from such vessel within any port in the territory of the other party, the authorities of such port and territory shall be bound to give every assistance in their power for the apprehension of such deserters, on application to that effect being made by the Consul of the party concerned, or by the deputy or representative of the Consul, and any person protecting or harbouring such deserters shall be liable to punishment.

ARTICLE XIX.

It shall be free for each of the two Contracting Parties to appoint Consuls for the protection of trade, to reside in the dominions and territories of the other party; but before any Consul shall act as such, he shall, in the usual form, be approved and admitted by the Government to which he is sent; and either of the Contracting Parties may except from the residence of Consuls such particular places as either of them may judge fit to be excepted.

The Diplomatic Agents and Consuls of each of the two High Contracting Parties in the dominions or territories of the other, shall enjoy whatever privileges, exemptions, and immunities are or shall be granted there to Agents of the same rank belonging to the most favoured nation.

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It shall be free for each of the Contracting Parties to appoint Consuls-General, Consuls, Vice-Consuls, and Consular Agents, to reside in the towns and ports of the dominions and possessions of the other. Such Consuls-General, Consuls, Vice-Consuls, and Consular Agents, however, shall not enter upon their functions until after they shall have been approved and admitted, in the usual form, by the Government to which they are sent. They shall exercise whatever functions, and enjoy whatever privileges, exemptions, and immunities are or shall be granted there to Consuls of the most favoured nation.

ARTICLE XVIII.

If any ship of war or merchant vessel of one of the Contracting Parties should rnu aground or be wrecked upon the coasts of the other, such ship or vessel, and all parts thereof, and all furniture and appurtenances belonging thereunto, and all goods and mer

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chandize saved therefrom, including any which may have been cast into the sea, or the Appendix No. 97. proceeds thereof, if sold, as well as all papers found on board such stranded or wrecked ship or vessel, shall be given up to the owners or their agents when claimed by them. If there are no such owners or agents on the spot, then the same shall be delivered to the British or Italian Consul-General, Consul, or Vice-Consul, in whose district the wreck or stranding may have taken place, upon being claimed by him within the period fixed by the laws of the country; and such Consuls, owners, or agents, shall pay only the expenses incurred in the preservation of the property, together with the salvage or other expenses which would have been payable in the like case of a wreck of a national vessel. The goods and merchandize saved from the wreck shall be exempt from all duties of Customs, unless cleared for consumption, in which case they shall pay the same rate of duty as if they had been imported in a national vessel.

In the case either of a vessel being driven in by stress of weather, run aground, or wrecked, the respective Consuls-General, Consuls, Vice-Consuls, and Consular Agents shall, if the owner or master or other agent of the owner is not present, or is present and requires it, be authorized to interpose in order to afford the necessary assistance to their fellow-countrymen.

ARTICLE XIX.

The Consuls-General, Consuls, Vice-Consuls, and Consular Agents of each of the Contracting Parties, residing in the dominions and possessions of the other, shall receive from the local authorities such assistance as can by law be given to them for the recovery of deserters from the vessels of their respective countries.

JAPAN.-August 26, 1858.

ARTICLE II.

Her Majesty the Queen of Great Britain and Ireland may appoint a Diplomatie Agent to reside at the city of Yedo, and Consuls or Consular Agents to reside at any or all the ports of Japan, which are opened for British commerce by this Treaty.

The Diplomatic Agent and Consul-General of Great Britain shall have the right to

travel freely to any part of the Empire of Japan.

His Majesty the Tycoon of Japan may appoint a diplomatic Agent to reside in
London, and Consuls, or Consular Agents, at any or all the ports of Great Britain.
The Diplomatic Agent and Consul-General of Japan shall have the right to travel
freely to any part of Great Britain.

ARTICLE III.

The place which British subjects shall occupy for their buildings, and the harbour regulations, shall be arranged by the British Consul and the Japanese authorities of each place, and, if they cannot agree, the matter shall be referred to and settled by the British Diplomatic Agent and the Japanese Government. No wall, fence, or gate shall be erected by the Japanese around the place where British subjects reside, or anything done which may prevent a free egress or ingress to the same.

ARTICLE V.

Japanese subjects, who may be guilty of any criminal act towards British subjects, shall be arrested and punished by the Japanese authorities according to the laws of Japan.

British subjects who may commit any crime against Japanese subjects, or the subjects or citizens of any other country, shall be tried and punished by the Consul, or other public functionary authorized thereto, according to the laws of Great Britain. Justice shall be equitably and impartially administered on both sides.

ARTICLE VI.

A British subject having reason to complain of a Japanese must proceed to the Consulate and state his grievance.

The Consul will inquire into the merits of the case, and do his utmost to arrange it amicably. In like manner, if a Japanese have reason to complain of a British subject, [339]

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Appendix No. 98. the Consul shall no less listen to his complaint, and endeavour to settle it in a friendly manner. If disputes take place of such a nature that the Consul cannot arrange them amicably, then he shall request the assistance of the Japanese authorities, that they may together examine into the merits of the case, and decide it equitably.

Japan.

ARTICLE XII.

If any British vessel be at any time wrecked or stranded on the coasts of Japan, or be compelled to take refuge in any port within the dominions of the Tycoon of Japan, the Japanese authorities, on being apprised of the fact, shall immediately render all the assistance in their power; the persons on board shall receive friendly treatment, and be furnished, if necessary, with the means of conveyance to the nearest Consular station.

ARTICLE XXI.

This Treaty being written in the English, Japanese and Dutch languages, and all the versions having the same meaning and intention, the Dutch version shall be considered the original; but it is understood that all official communications, addressed by the Diplomatic and Consular Agents of Her Majesty the Queen of Great Britain to the Japanese authorities, shall henceforward be written in English. In order, however, to facilitate the transaction of business, they will, for a period of five years from the signature of this Treaty, be accompanied by a Dutch or Japanese version.

REGULATIONS FOR BRITISH TRADE.

I. Within forty-eight hours (Sundays excepted) after the arrival of a British ship in a Japanese port, the captain or commander shall exhibit to the Japanese Custom-house authorities the receipt of the British Consul, showing that he has deposited all the ship's papers the ship's bills of lading, &c., at the British Consulate, and he shall then make an entry of his ship, by giving a written paper, stating the name of the ship, and the name of the port from which she comes, her tonnage, the name of her captain or commander, the names of her passengers (if any), and the number of her crew, which paper shall be certified by the captain or commander to be a true statement, and shall be signed by him; he shall, at the same time, deposit a written manifest of his cargo, setting forth the marks and numbers of the packages and their contents, as they are described in his bills of lading, with the names of the person or persons to whom they are consigned. A list of the stores of the ship shall be added to the manifest. The captain or commander shall certify the manifest to be a true account of all the cargo and stores on board the ship, and shall sign his name to the same.

If any error is discovered in the manifest, it may be corrected within twenty-four hours (Sundays excepted) without the payment of any fee, but for any alteration or post entry to the manifest made after that time, a fee of fifteen dollars shall be paid.

All goods not entered in the manifest shall pay double duties on being landed.
Any captain or commander that shall neglect to enter his vessel at the Japanese
Custom-house within the time' prescribed by this regulation, shall pay a penalty of sixty
dollars for each day that he shall so neglect to enter his ship.

IV. Ships wishing to clear shall give twenty-four hours' notice at the Custom-house, and at the end of that time they shall be entitled to their clearance, but if it be refused, the Custom-house authorities shall immediately inform the captain or consignee of the ship of the reasons why the clearance is refused; and they shall also give the same notice to the British Consul.

British ships of war shall not be required to enter or clear at the Custom-house, nor shall they be visited by Japanese Custom-house or police officers.

Steamers conveying the mails of Great Britain may enter and clear on the same day, and they shall not be required to make a manifest, except for such passengers and goods as are to be landed in Japan. But such steamers shall, in all cases, enter and clear at the Custom-house.

Whale-ships touching for supplies, or ships in distress, shall not be required to make a manifest of their cargo; but if they subsequently wish to trade they shall then deposit a manifest, as required in Regulation I.

The word "ship," wherever it occurs in these Regulations, or in the Treaty to which they are attached, is to be held as meaning ship, barque, brig, schooner, sloop, or

steamer,

JOHANNA.-June 3, 1850.-Commerce.

ARTICLE VII.

Each Contracting Party may appoint Consuls for the protection of trade, to reside in the dominions of the other; but no such Consul shall enter upon the exercise of his functions until he shall have been approved and admitted, in the usual form, by the Government of the country to which he is sent.

LIBERIA. -November 21, 1848.-Commerce.

ARTICLE VIII.

Each Contracting Party may appoint Consuls for the protection of trade, to reside in the dominions of the other; but no such Consul shall enter upon the exercise of his functions until he shall have been approved and admitted, in the usual form, by the Government of the country to which he is sent.

MADAGASCAR.-June 27, 1865.

ARTICLE IV.

The Queen of Madagascar engages to receive a British Agent at her capital; and Her Britannic Majesty, in like manner, engages to receive at the Mauritius, or at London, an Agent of the Queen of Madagascar.

Each Contracting Party may appoint Consuls for the protection of trade, to reside in the dominions of the other.

Such Agents and Consuls shall enjoy, in the respective dominions, the same rights and privileges which are or may be there granted to Agents of the same rank of the most favoured nation.

ARTICLE V.

British subjects shall be permitted, as fully as the subjects or citizens of the most favoured nation, in any lawful manner to purchase, rent, or lease land, houses, warehouses, and all other kinds of property within all parts of the dominions of Her Majesty the Queen of Madagascar which are under the control of a Governor duly appointed by the Malagasy authorities. They shall be at liberty to build on land purchased, rented, or leased by them, houses of any material they please, except of stone or clay at the capital of Madagascar, and other towns where such buildings are forbidden by the laws of the country; and Her Majesty the Queen of Madagascar engages that British subjects shall, as far as lies in her power, equally with her own subjects, enjoy within her dominions full and complete protection and security for themselves and for any property which they may so acquire in future, or which they may have acquired already before the date of the present Treaty.

British subjects may freely engage in their service, in any capacity whatever, any native of Madagascar not a slave or a soldier, who may be free from any previous engagement. Leases, contracts of sale or purchase of houses or lands in Madagascar, and engagements of labourers, may be executed by deeds signed before the British Consul and the local authorities. All such engagements, however, are liable to be determined by mutual consent, should the services of persons so engaged be required by the Queen, or on their own application, after due notice.

No domiciliary visits shall be made to the establishments, houses, or properties possessed or occupied by British subjects, unless by the consent of the occupants, or in concert with the British Consul.

Appendix No. 99.

Johanna.

Appendix No. 100.
Liberia,

Appendix No.101.
Madagascar,

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