The True History of Tom and Jerry; Or, the Day and Night Scenes of Life in London, from the Start to the Finish!: With a Key to the Persons and Places, Together with a Vocabulary and Glossary of the Flash and Slang Terms Occuring in the Course of the Work

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C. Hindley, 1899 - 216 pages
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Page 2 - LIFE IN LONDON : or, the Day and Night Scenes of Jerry Hawthorn, Esq., and his Elegant Friend, Corinthian Tom.
Page 169 - Ah! could you but see Bet Bouncer, of these parts, you might then talk of beauty. Ecod, she has two eyes as black as sloes, and cheeks as broad and red as a pulpit cushion.
Page 83 - How lov'd, how honour'd once, avails thee not, To whom related, or by whom begot ; A heap of dust alone remains of thee, 'Tis all thou art, and all the proud shall be ! Poets themselves must fall, like those they sung, Deaf the prais'd ear, and mute the tuneful tongue.
Page 131 - Finish to the Adventures of Tom, Jerry, and Logic in their Pursuits through Life in and out of London...
Page 189 - Twas Landlady Meg that made such rare flip — Pull away, pull away, hearties ! At Wapping she liv'd, at the sign of the Ship, Where tars meet in such jolly parties.
Page viii - Di, quibus imperium est animarum, umbraeque silentes, et Chaos et Phlegethon, loca nocte tacentia late, 265 sit mihi fas audita loqui, sit numine vestro pandere res alta terra et caligine mersas.
Page 158 - I'll kneel down, And ask of thee forgiveness; so we'll live, // And pray, and sing, and tell old tales, and laugh At gilded butterflies, and hear poor rogues Talk of court news; and we'll talk with them too, Who loses and who wins; who's in, who's out...
Page 13 - Flash, my young friend, or slang as others call it, is the classical language of the Holy Land ; in other words, St. Giles's Greek. Jerry. St. Giles's Greek ; that is a language, doctor, with which I am totally unacquainted, although I was brought up at a Grammar School.
Page 95 - REAL LIFE IN IRELAND; OR, THE DAY AND NIGHT SCENES, ROVINGS, RAMBLES, AND SPREES, BULLS, BLUNDERS, BODDERATION AND BLARNEY, OF BRIAN BORU, ESQ. AND HIS ELEGANT FRIEND SIR SHAWN O'DOGHERTY.
Page ix - Mr. Salter was a noted barber, who began to make a collection of natural curiosities, which acquired him the name (probably first given him by Steele) of Don Saltero. He formerly kept a coffee-house at Chelsea, the curiosities of •which were lately sold by auction.

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