The Calcutta Review, Volume 24

Couverture
University of Calcutta, 1855
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Page 285 - And again, when he bringeth in the first-begotten into the world, he saith, And let all the angels of God worship him.
Page 120 - HOW are thy servants blest, O Lord, How sure is their defence ! Eternal wisdom is their guide, Their help, omnipotence.
Page 72 - To improve land with profit, like all other commercial projects, requires an exact attention to small savings and small gains of which a man born to a great fortune, even though naturally frugal. is very seldom capable. The situation of such a person naturally disposes him to attend rather to ornament which pleases his fancy, than to profit for which he has so little occasion.
Page 329 - Just then, as through one cloudless chink in a black ,stormy sky Shines out the dewy morning-star, a fair young girl came by. With her small tablets in her hand, and her satchel on her arm, Home she went bounding from the school, nor dreamed of shame or harm...
Page 75 - No society can surely be flourishing and happy, of which the far greater part of the members are poor and miserable. It is but equity, besides, that they who feed, clothe and lodge the whole body of the people, should have such a share of the produce of their own labour as to be themselves tolerably well fed, clothed and lodged.
Page 317 - will never be what it might be, and what it ought to be." The remonstrances which he encountered both on public and private grounds were vehement and numerous. But on these terms alone had he taken his office ; and he solemnly and repeatedly declared, that on no other terms could he hold it, or justify the existence of the public-school system in a Christian country.
Page 136 - Blessed are the dead who die in the Lord, for they rest from their labors, and their works do follow them!
Page 285 - Adam, dwell thou and thy wife in paradise; and eat of the fruit thereof wherever ye will; but approach not this tree, lest ye become of the number of the unjust.
Page 76 - It deserves to be remarked, perhaps, that it is in the progressive state, while the society is advancing to the further acquisition, rather than when it has acquired its full complement of riches, that the condition of the labouring poor, of the great body of the people, seems to be the happiest and the most comfortable.
Page 76 - The progressive state is in reality the cheerful and the hearty state to all the different orders of the society. The stationary is dull; the declining melancholy.

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