The Politics of the Irish Civil War

Couverture
OUP Oxford, 25 août 2005 - 264 pages
Based on extensive archival research this book situates the Irish civil war in the general process of decolonization in the twentieth century, and explains why divisions over the Anglo-Irish Treaty of 1921 proved so formative in the development of the Irish state. Each chapter is devoted to a particular aspect of the war and many new areas are explored. These include the role the doctrine of self-determination played in the Sinn Fein movement, the fate of numerous peace initiatives,the power struggle between de Valera and Liam Lynch within the IRA, and the impact of the civil war on the wider civil society. The last three chapters explore how the conflict has been interpreted by the actors themselves, as well as by historians. Combining perspectives drawn from history andpolitics, this book will interest not only students of Irish history, but also those interested in the comparative study of civil wars.
 

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LibraryThing Review

Avis d'utilisateur  - thegeneral - LibraryThing

This book demolishes a lot of the prevalent myths about the Civil War, in particular the one that de Valera started it. Anyone who has read some works of Coogan should read this. The main issue I have with the book is the small font size likely to be an issue with some readers. Consulter l'avis complet

Table des matières

1 Introduction
1
2 Decolonization and Civil War in Comparative Perspective
14
3 The Doctrine of Selfdetermination and the Treaty Split
39
4 The Course of the Civil War
64
5 Explaining the Intractability of the Conflict
99
Intermediary Organizations and the Civil War
126
7 Protective Democracy and the Establishment of the Free State
151
8 Defending the Republic and the Rise of Fianna Fail
177
9 Historians and the Civil War
202
10 Conclusion
231
Bibliography
241
Index
253
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Bill Kissane is Lecturer in Politics in the Department of Government, London School of Economics.

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