The Works of Sir William Temple, Bart: To which is Prefixed, the Life and Character of the Author, Considerably Enlarged, Volume 2

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F. C. and J. Rivington, 1814
 

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Page 432 - Well, I never yet was deceived in judging of a man's honesty by his looks (of which he gave me some examples), and if I am not deceived in the Prince's face, he is the honestest man in the world, and I will trust him, and he shall have his wife, and you shall go immediately and tell my brother so, and that it is a thing I am resolved on.
Page 547 - Temple, referring to the same subject, adds, " And this person having the name of the greatest lawyer in England, and commonly, of a very wise man ; besides this, of a very rich, and of a wary or rather timorous nature, made people generally conclude, that the thing was certain and safe, and would at last be agreed on all parts, whatever countenance were made at court.
Page 566 - ... and the infidelity of friends ; nor do I think the rest of my life enough to make any new experiments. " For the ease of my own life, if I know myself, it will be infinitely more in the retired than it has been in the busy scene : for no good man can, with any satisfaction, take part in the divisions of his country that knows and considers as I do what they have cost Athens, Rome, Constantinople, Florence, Germany, France, and England : nor can the wisest man...
Page 284 - I had a mind to know from Prince Maurice's own mouth, the account of a common, but much credited, story, that I had heard so often from many others, of an old parrot he had in Brazil, during his government there, that spoke, and asked, and answered, common questions, like a reasonable creature; so that those of his train there generally concluded it to be witchery or possession...
Page 284 - ... in Holland, would never, from that time, endure a parrot, but said, they all had a devil in them. I had heard many particulars of...
Page 248 - ... where he gets as easy a seat as he can, entertains himself with what passes upon the stage, not caring who the actors are, or what the plot, nor whether he goes out before the play be done.
Page 536 - ... with his affairs, it was in his power to dissolve them, and constitute another of twenty, of ten, or of five, or any number he pleased...
Page 508 - And both these considerations, meeting together, cast me upon the thoughts of the king's establishing a new council, of such a constitution as might either gain credit enough with the present parliament, by taking in so many persons of those who had most among them, and thereby give ease and quiet both to the king and his people; , or if, on the other side, the humours should grow outrageous and beyond opposing, the king might yet, at the head of such a council, with more authority and less hazard...
Page 411 - ... they have, and another of unquiet men, who desire to acquire what they have not, and by violent, if they cannot by lawful, means. Therefore I never could find a better way of judging the resolutions of a State than by the personal temper and understanding, or passions and humours, of the princes or chief ministers that were for the time at the head of affairs.
Page 458 - Cios was gained, or by whom, I will not pretend to determine,- but upon my next return for England, the Duke told me, That He knew nothing of it, till it was gone, having been a Hunting that morning; My Lord...

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