Heinrich Caro and the Creation of Modern Chemical Industry

Couverture
Springer Science & Business Media, 31 oct. 2000 - 453 pages
Heinrich Caro (1834-1910) was the inventor of new chemical processes that in the two decades commencing in 1869 enabled BASF of Ludwigshafen, Germany, to take first place among manufacturers of synthetic dyestuffs. The cornerstones of Caro's success were his early training as calico (cotton) printer in Germany, and his employment at a chemical firm in Manchester, England. Caro was a creative research chemist, a highly knowledgeable patent specialist and expert witness, and a brilliant manager of science-based chemical technology. This first full-length scientific biography of Heinrich Caro delineates his role in the emergence of the industrial research laboratory, the forging of links between academic and industrial chemistry, and the development of modern patent law. Major chemical topics include the rise of classical organic chemistry, collaboration with Adolf Baeyer, artificial alizarin and indigo, aniline dyes, and other coal-tar products, particularly intermediates.
 

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Table des matières

Chemistry and Revolution
1
Calico Printing in Miilheim
25
The Manchester Years 18591866
49
Negotiating Sciencebased Technology
89
Chemical Theory From Chemical Industry
109
The Chemist as Inventor
125
AcademicIndustrial Collaboration
177
The Industrial Research Laboratory
219
Ambitious and Glory Hunting Impractical and Fantastic
291
A Chemical Celebrity
305
Heinrich Caro Genius and Myth
345
Notes
359
Bibliography
425
Chapter Location of Major Dye Classes Important Individual Dyes DyeIntermediates and Raw Materials
439
Name Index
441
Droits d'auteur

Patents and Agreements
257

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