Dynamic of Destruction : Culture and Mass Killing in the First World War: Culture and Mass Killing in the First World War

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OUP Oxford, 12 juil. 2007 - 448 pages
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On 26 August 1914 the world-famous university library in the Belgian town of Louvain was looted and destroyed by German troops. The international community reacted in horror - 'Holocaust at Louvain' proclaimed the Daily Mail - and the behaviour of the Germans at Louvain came to be seen as the beginning of a different style of war, without the rules that had governed military conflict up to that point - a more total war, in which enemy civilians and their entire culture were now 'legitimate' targets. Yet the destruction at Louvain was simply one symbolic moment in a wider wave of cultural destruction and mass killing that swept Europe in the era of the First World War. Using a wide range of examples and eye-witness accounts from across Europe at this time, award-winning historian Alan Kramer paints a picture of an entire continent plunging into a chilling new world of mass mobilization, total warfare, and the celebration of nationalist or ethnic violence - often directed expressly at the enemy's civilian population.
 

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Avis d'utilisateur  - rgurskey - LibraryThing

A very academic look at certain features of the First World War. Consulter l'avis complet

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Table des matières

The Burning of Louvain
5
The Radicalization of Warfare
30
The Warriors
68
German Singularity?
113
Culture and War
158
Trench Warfare and its Consequences
210
War Bodies and Minds
229
Victory Trauma and PostWar Disorder
267
Conclusion
327
Historiographical Note
338
Hague Convention IV Respecting the Laws and Customs of War on Land 1907
346
Notes
348
Bibliography
393
Sources and Acknowledgements for Illustrations
415
Index
418
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