Memoirs of the Life, Writings, and Discoveries of Sir Isaac Newton, Volume 2

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T. Constable and Company, 1855
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Page 405 - I do not know what I may appear to the world, but to myself I seem to have been only like a boy playing on the seashore, and diverting myself in now and then finding a smoother pebble or a prettier shell than ordinary, whilst the great ocean of truth lay all undiscovered before me.
Page 478 - April in the fourth year of the reign of our Sovereign Lady Anne by the Grace of God of England, Scotland, France and Ireland Queen Defender of the Faith &c and in the year of Our Lord one thousand seven hundred and five.
Page 329 - He gave this and the Prophecies of the Old Testament, not to gratify men's curiosities by enabling them to foreknow things, but that after they were fulfilled they might be interpreted by the event, and his own Providence, not the Interpreters, be then manifested thereby to the world.
Page 524 - And whosoever will not do the law of thy God, and the law of the king, let judgment be executed speedily upon him, whether it be unto death, or to banishment, or to confiscation of goods, or to imprisonment.
Page 187 - Sir, I have brought a mouse to wait on your majesty." To which the king is said to have replied, "You do well to put me in the way of making a man of him;" and ordered him a pension of five hundred pounds.
Page 346 - By this we know that we love the children of God, when we love God, and keep his commandments. For this is the love of God that we keep his commandments; and his commandments are not grievous.
Page 412 - Bishop Atterbury asserts, on the other hand, that the lively and piercing eye did not belong to Sir Isaac during the last twenty years of his life. " Indeed," says he, " in the whole air of his face and make there was nothing of that penetrating sagacity which appears in his compositions. He had something rather languid in his look and manner, which did not raise any great expectation in those who did not know him.
Page 148 - I could not have believed what you tell me of yourself, had I had it from any body else. And though I cannot but be mightily troubled that you should have had so many wrong and unjust thoughts of me, yet next to the return of good offices, such as from a sincere good will I have ever done you, I receive your acknowledgment of the contrary as the kindest thing you could have done me, since it gives me hopes that I have not lost a friend I so much valued.
Page 464 - It is inconceivable, that inanimate brute matter should, without the mediation of something else, which is not material, operate upon, and affect other matter without mutual contact; as it must do, if gravitation, in the sense of Epicurus, be essential and inherent in it.
Page 92 - ... not spent in his studies, to which he kept so close that he seldom left his chamber except at term time, when he read in the schools as Lucasianus Professor, where so few went to hear him, and fewer that understood him, that oft-times he did in a manner, for want of hearers, read to the walls.

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