Onondaga Iroquois Prehistory: A Study in Settlement Archaeology

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Syracuse University Press, 1 sept. 1990 - 272 pages
The book opens with a brief historical outline of Onondaga culture and a sketch of the major developments in Iroquois prehistory. Each site is described, with a short account of its discovery, location in relation to other sites and natural features, testing and excavations, and artifacts. The site descriptions are arranged in chronological “phases”— Castle Creek, Oak Hill, Chance, and Garoga—based upon William A. Ritchie’s classification. In the last chapter, Professor Tuck summaries his wealth of data and interprets the origin and development of Onondaga culture in view of his archaeological findings, which also make us of radiocarbon dating techniques. The illustrations are an essential part of the book. Forty-four plates show arrowpoints, ceramic sherds, post molds revealing outlines of longhouses, cooking pits, occasional human burials, smoking pipes, and much more. Eight figures provide maps of sites, specific details of excavations, and a chronological sequence of Onondaga villages. Twenty-one tales give the frequencies and percentages of smoking pipe varieties, faunal remains, ceramic types, and other items discovered in the field work. An appendix includes techniques of ceramic analysis and many line drawings of ceramic varieties.
 

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Table des matières

Historical Background
1
The Castle Creek Phase
22
Drumlin on which Chamberlin site is located
26
small hearth
27
Feature 1
28
ceramics
32
ceramics
36
artifacts
38
Frequencies and Percentages of Smoking Pipe Varieties from the Bloody Hill Site
117
Faunal Remains from the Bloody Hill Site
118
ceramics
121
ceramics
124
intersecting stockades
128
ceramics
129
artifacts
130
Frequencies and Percentages of Smoking Pipe Varieties from the Burke Site
133

bone artifacts
43
Faunal Remains from the Cabin Site
44
The Oak Hill Phase
47
possible gateway in inner stockade
51
post molds in outer stockade
52
aerial view of excavations
53
large storage pit
54
small hearth in outdoor cooking area
55
ceramics
56
artifacts
57
Frequencies and Percentages of Smoking Pipe Varieties from the Furnace Brook Site
66
Frequencies and Percentages of Projectile Point Forms from the Furnace Brook Site
67
Faunal Remains from the Furnace Brook Site
70
Frequencies and Percentages of Smoking Pipe Varieties from the Kelso Site
75
extension of House 2
80
small house
81
aerial view of excavations
82
ceramics
83
artifacts
84
from the Howlett Hill Site
88
Faunal Remains from the Howlett Hill Site
89
artifacts
91
The Chance Phase
93
roasting platform
98
ceramics
99
artifacts
100
hilltop location
105
post molds delimiting house
106
of human bones
108
ceramics
109
artifacts
110
Faunal Remains from the Burke Site
135
The Garoga Phase
140
artifacts
143
Faunal Remains from the Cemetery Site
146
ceramics
151
smoking pipes and humanface effigies 38 Barnes site stone artifacts
153
bone and shell artifacts
154
Frequencies and Percentages of Smoking Pipe Varieties from the Barnes Site
156
Attributes of Bone Harpoons from the Barnes Site
159
Ceramic Type Percentages from the Atwell and Temperance House Sites after Ricklis 1963
168
The Onondaga 16001795
171
Ceramic Types from the Chase Site after Ricklis 1966
173
Ceramic Types from the Quirk Site after Ricklis 1966
174
artifacts
179
wooden bowl and ladle
180
smoking pipes
181
burial
190
Trade Bead Varieties from the Weston Site
191
log house
194
Excavations at the Schoff Site 1967 95
195
Comparisons and Conclusions
196
Average Coefficients of Correlation based on Ceramic Attributes
199
Coefficients of Correlation Between Pairs of Sites Based on Smoking Pipe Varieties
201
Average Lengths Widths and LengthWidth Ratios for Projectile Points from Onondaga Sites
203
Chronological Sequence of Onondaga Villages Showing
210
Appendix
227
Appendix
239
Bibliography
245
Index
251
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À propos de l'auteur (1990)

James A. Tuck received the Ph.D. from Syracuse University. He is author of many articles on Northeastern prehistory and is archaeological consultant to the Department of Provincial Affairs, Government of Newfoundland and Labrador. Tuck is associate professor of anthropology, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s, where he is also associated with the Institute for Social and Economic Research. His current field work includes investigating the archaeology of Northern Labrador.

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