Split Screen: Belgian Cinema and Cultural Identity

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SUNY Press, 2001 - 251 pages
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In presenting the first English language study of Belgian cinema, Split Screen explores the fascinating history of a cinema largely determined by linguistic division and beset by problems of cultural identity. This "split screen" characterizes the Belgian cinema, which has not received the critical praise that it deserves, despite the recent international successes of films like Toto the Hero, and the achievements of individual directors such as Henri Storck, André Delvaux, and Chantal Akerman. In surveying the evolution of Belgian cinema from its beginnings to the present day, Philip Mosley locates all the major feature films, describes the crucial intervention of the state in film production, and reveals undervalued Belgian traditions in documentary, in animation, in short films, and in a colonial cinema created partly by missionaries in the former Belgian Congo. Due to the political and economic transformations affecting Europe, the reforms of the Belgian state, and the increasing globalization of world media industries, Belgian cinema can now inscribe itself within new national and international contexts.
 

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Table des matières

Belgian Cinema and Cultural Identity
1
Beginnings to the Coming of Sound
27
Sound to Liberation 19301945
45
The Postwar Period 19451960
67
A New Era 19601975
97
Reaction and Revival 1975
135
Belgian Cinema and the New Europe
199
NOTES
223
WORKS CITED
229
INDEX
239
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À propos de l'auteur (2001)

Philip Mosley is Associate Professor of English, Communications, and Comparative Literature at Pennsylvania State University-Worthington Scranton.

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