Rivalry and the Disruption of Order in Molière's Theater

Couverture
Fairleigh Dickinson Univ Press, 2004 - 216 pages
In critical readings of ten of Moliere's most important plays, this book argues that a rivalry that endangers order by collapsing differences structures the works and provides a key to their understanding. Moliere's great comic characters all want desperately something that they cannot have. The objects of their desire may vary, but the presence of desire itself remains a constant. In L'Ecole des femmes. Amolphe wants, above all, to avoid cuckoldry. The title character in Dom Juan covets women. The bourgeois Monsieur Jourdain does all in his power to become a gentleman in Le Bourgeois gentilhomme, and the eponymous character in George Dandin views his woes as the price of an ill-fated marriage that he had hoped would elevate him to noble rank. Le malade imaginaire, Argan, has a seemingly crazy desire to be sick. The list could go on.
 

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Table des matières

Introduction
5
Love and Rivalry The Ties That Bind
10
Power and Identity The Method in Arnolphes Madness
27
Enemy Brothers The Interdependence of Orgon and Tartuffe
48
Grand seigneur méchant homme Dom Juan and the Credo of Conquest
64
The World Turned Upside Down Rivalry and Ressentiment in Amphitryon
79
Dark Comedy Disorder and Sacrifice in George Dandin
99
Jai découvert que mon père est mon rival Love Greed and Rivalry in LAvare
113
Impossible Desire Becoming a Mamamouchi in Le Bourgeois gentilhomme
132
Philosophers and Fools The World of Les Femmes savantes
146
Doctors and Actors The Victory of Comedy in Le Malade imaginaire
165
Notes
179
Works Cited
198
Droits d'auteur

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