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THE

UNITED SERVICE

JOURNAL

AND

Nabal and Military Magazine.

1833. PART II.

LONDON:

PUBLISHED FOR HENRY COLBURN

BY RICHARD BENTLEY, NEW BURLINGTON STREET.

LONDON: PRINTED BY WILLIAM CLOWES,

Duke-street, Lambeth,

THE

UNITED SERVICE JOURNAL. .

COLONIES.

THEIR INFLUENCE ON MARITIME AND MILITARY ASCENDANCY. No event in modern history has been made the ground-work of more sweeping conclusions, than the severance from the British crown of the American colonies, whose independence was recognized in 1783. this single fact, a class of politicians have essayed to found a system of doctrines, whose truth or falsehood it is, to England especially, a oint of the last importance to determine rightly. Those colonies, at the period of their combining to throw off the yoke of the mother-country, had, in the opinion of the persons we allude to, risen to that pitch of wealth and intelligence,-attained that degree of political strength and social consolidation, that it would have been impossible for England, under any circumstances, much longer to have maintained control over them. In a general and more alarming shape, too, the announcement is put forth, that, whenever society shall have reached a similar state of maturity in any of the colonies now belonging to Great Britain, the day will not be distant, when she must again submit to further loss of colonial dominion. It has been attempted, in effect, to introduce among the maxims of political science the proposition, that a colony can be retained in subjection only in its infancy,--only so long, that is to say, as its existence, in a manner, depends on the assistance and protection of a wealthier and more powerful state, while its poverty at the same time prevents any adequate return for such benefits. The moment it rises into importance, and arrives at that point of improvement when the connexion might become really valuable to the parent state, it is asserted, the tie must break,—the colony gain its independence.

Could we, in truth, give our assent to such doctrine, how preposterous should we deem the course of policy our country has now pursued for a period of three hundred years! Even in the reign of Henry VII., Great Britain displayed her eagerness for the acquisition of distant territory; and at so early a date commences her claim to extensive regions in America, founded on the discoveries of Sebastian Cabot. But with what amazing perseverance and success has she followed up her first attempt to obtain colonial jurisdiction! At this moment an eastern population, not far below that comprised within the entire circuit of the Roman empire in its day of widest dominion, acknowledges England's sovereignty-while her territories in the new world cover a larger space than was occupied by any of the mightiest monarchies of antiquity, and equal in superficial extent nearly the whole of the two Russias. Now, if colonies can remain such only while society there is in an incipient state,- before industry has had time to accumulate wealth, and the arts of civilization to apply it,

U.S. Journ. No. 54, MAY, 1833.

B

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