Memoir of William Carey, D, D.: Late Missionary to Bengal, Professor of Oriental Languages in the College of Fort William, Calcultta

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Canfield and Robins, 1837 - 468 pages
 

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Page 230 - It is of the Lord's mercies that we are not consumed, because his compassions fail not.
Page 418 - And let us not be weary in well doing : for 'in due season we shall reap, if we faint not.
Page 284 - Troubled on every side, yet not distressed ; perplexed, but not in despair ; persecuted, but not forsaken ; cast down, but not destroyed ; always bearing about in the body the dying of the Lord Jesus.
Page 310 - What manner of communications are these that ye have one to another, as ye walk, and are sad? And the one of them, whose name was Cleopas, answering said unto him, Art thou only a stranger in Jerusalem, and hast not known the things which are come to pass there in these days...
Page 81 - Let us therefore, as many as be perfect, be thus minded: and if in any thing ye be otherwise minded, God shall reveal even this unto you. 16 Nevertheless, whereto we have already attained, let us walk by the same rule, let us mind the same thing.
Page 457 - But let every man prove his own work, and then shall he have rejoicing in himself alone, and not in another.
Page 456 - But when it pleased God, who separated me from my mother's womb, and called me by his grace, to reveal his Son in me, that I might preach him among the heathen; immediately I conferred not with flesh and blood...
Page 147 - Our rejoicing is this, the testimony of our conscience, that in simplicity and godly sincerity we have had our conversation in the world...
Page 139 - Your adversary the devil goeth about as a roaring lion, seeking whom he may devour ; whom resist.
Page 384 - In every walk ! — that here may shoot Thy scions, and thy buds expand, A hundred from one root. Thrice welcome, little English flower ! To me the pledge of hope unseen : When sorrow would my soul o'erpower, For joys that were, or might have been, I'll call to mind, how, fresh and green, I saw thee waking from the dust ; Then turn to heaven with brow serene, And place in GOD my trust.

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