Saturday Reader, Volume 2

Couverture
W. B. Cordier., 1866
 

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Page 17 - Say there be ; Yet nature is made better by no mean But nature makes that mean : so, over that art Which you say adds to nature, is an art That nature makes. You see, sweet maid, we marry A gentler scion to the wildest stock, And make conceive a bark of baser kind By bud of nobler race : this is an art Which does mend nature, change it rather, but The art itself is nature.
Page 18 - My pulse, as yours, doth temperately keep time, And makes as healthful music: it is not madness That I have utter'd: bring me to the test, And I the matter will re-word, which madness Would gambol from.
Page 81 - If music be the food of love, play on ; Give me excess of it, that, surfeiting, The appetite may sicken, and so die.
Page 17 - O Proserpina, For the flowers now, that frighted thou let'st fall From Dis's waggon ! daffodils, That come before the swallow dares, and take The winds of March with beauty ; violets dim, But sweeter than the lids of Juno's eyes Or Cytherea's breath ; pale primroses, That die unmarried, ere they can behold Bright Phoebus in his strength — a malady Most incident to maids ; bold oxlips and The crown imperial ; lilies of all kinds, The flower-de-luce being one...
Page 50 - Even these of them ye may eat ; the locust after his kind, and the bald locust after his kind, and the beetle after his kind, and the grasshopper after his kind.
Page 178 - As for money, which may be said to be the third blessing, neglect it not: but note, that there is no necessity of being rich ; for I told you there be as many miseries beyond riches, as on this side them : and if you have a competence, enjoy it with a meek, cheerful, thankful heart.
Page 177 - But his friend, knowing his temper, told him, If he would find content in any of his houses, he must leave himself behind him ; for content will never dwell but in a meek and quiet soul.
Page 177 - Let us not repine, or so much as think the gifts of God unequally dealt, if we see another abound with riches ; when, as God knows, the cares that are the keys that keep those riches, hang often so heavily at the rich man's girdle, that they clog him with weary days and restless nights, even when others sleep quietly.
Page 17 - Sir, the year growing ancient, Not yet on summer's death, nor on the birth Of trembling winter, — the fairest flowers o...
Page 177 - ... that kingdom of heaven, by being humble and cheerful, and content with what his good God has allotted him. He has no turbulent, repining, vexatious thoughts that he deserves better; nor is vexed when he sees others possessed of more...

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