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and military stores included in the douceur for peace will probably amount to about $120,000, making the whole douceur and the ransom of the prisoners about $763,000, and that, besides the stipulated annuity of 12,000 sequins, the custom of Algiers will render necessary a present, biennially, of nine or ten thousand dollars, and upon the appointment of a consul a present of $20,000.

That of the money included in the douceur for peace $60,000 were paid at the time of signing the treaty. The residue was expected to be paid soon and when the prisoners should be released, and has probably been paid.

And that in the opinion of the committee it will be expedient for the Senate to advise and consent to a ratification of the treaty.

(Am. St. Pap., Vol. I, p. 549; Ex. Jour., Vol. I, pp. 198, 199, 200.)

FOURTH CONGRESS, SECOND SESSION.

January 23, 1797.
On the treaty with the Creek Indians, Mr. Read reported as follows:

Resolved (two-thirds of the Senate concurring therein), That they do consent to and advise the President of the United States to ratify the treaty of peace and friendship made and concluded at Colerain, in the State of Georgia, on the 29th of June, 1796, between the President of the United States of America, on the part and behalf of the said States, and the kings, chiefs, and warriors of the Creek Nation of Indians on the part of the said nation: Provided, and on condition, That nothing in the third and fourth articles of said treaty, expressed in the words following:

“Article third. The President of the United States shall have full powers, whenever he may deem it advisable, to establish a trading or military post on the south side of the Altamaha on the bluff about one mile above Beard's Bluff, or from thence down the said river to the lands of the Indians; to garrison the same with any part of the military force of the United States, to protect the posts, and to prevent the violation of any of the provisions or regulations subsisting between the parties; and the Indians do hereby annex to the post aforesaid a tract of land five miles square, bordering on one side on the river, which post and the lands annexed thereto are hereby ceded to and shall be to the use and under the Government of the United States of America.

“Article fourth. As soon as the President of the United States has determined the time and manner of running the line from the Currahee Mountain to the head or source of the main south branch of the Oconee, and notified the chiefs of the Creek land of the same, a suitable number of persons on their part shall attend to see the same completed; and if the President shall deem it proper to then fix on any place or places adjoining the river, and on the Indian lands, for the military or trading posts the Creeks who attend there will concur in fixing the same according to the wishes of the President. And to each post the Indians shall annex a tract of land five miles square, bordering one side on the river; and the said lands shall be to the use and under the Government of the United States of America.

Provided always, That whenever any of the trading or military posts mentioned in this treaty shall, in the opinion of the President of the United States of America, be no longer necessary for the pur

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poses intended by this cession, the same shall revert to and become a part of the Indian lands,” shall be construed to affect any claim of the State of Georgia to the right of preemption in the land therein set apart for military or trading posts; or to give to the United States any right to the soil, or to the exclusive legislation over the same, or any other right than that of establishing, maintaining, and exclusively governing military and trading posts within the Indian territory mentioned in the said articles as long as the frontier of Georgia may require these establishments.

(Êx. Jour., vol. 1, pp. 221, 222, 231.)

FIFTH CONGRESS, FIRST SESSION.

June 7, 1797.

Mr. Bloodworth made the following report:

The Committee on Foreign Relations, to whom was referred the treaty made between the United States and the Bey of Tripoli, and signed by Joel Barlow at Algiers on the 3d of January, 1797, beg leave to make the following report:

T'he cost of the presents agreed to be made in consideration of the negotiation of the treaty to the Bey of Tripoli and others, according to the information of your comittee, is as follows: To be paid on the ratification of the treaty: In specie ...

$40,000 13 watches, at $30 each

390 5 rings, at $50 each

250 Cloth and brocade..

200

40, 840

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Total..

55, 750 Your committee recommend the ratification of the treaty, and beg to report the following resolution:

Resolved, That the President of the United States be informed that the Senate (two-thirds concurring) do advise and consent to the ratification of the said treaty.

(Ex. Jour., vol. 1, p. 244.)

FIFTH CONGRESS, SECOND SESSION.

February 28, 1798.

On the treaty with Tunis Mr. Bingham reported as follows:

That a peace with the Bey of Tunis, after a variety of difficulties and a tedious negotiation, has been at length concluded on the following terms, viz: In money

$50,000 In naval stores, called regalia

35,000 In peace presents

12,000 In consul's presents

4,000 In sackatappa, or secret-service money

6,000

107,000 The greatest portion of which, it is supposed, has already been disbursed through the medium of a temporary loan obtained on account of the United States.

The committee further report the following resolution: Resolved, That the Senate do advise and consent to the ratification of the treaty of peace and friendship between the United States of America and the Bey and Government of Tunis, concluded in the month of August, 1797, on condition that the fourteenth article of the said treaty, which relates to the duties on merchandise (to be reciprocally paid by the citizens and subjects of the said parties in their respective ports) shall be suspended.

That it shall be recommended to the President of the United States to enter into a friendly negotiation with the Bey and Government of Tunis on the subject of the said article, so as to accommodate the provisions thereof to the existing treaties of the United States with other nations.

(Ex. Jour., vol. 1, pp. 262, 263; Am. St. Pap., vol. 2, p. 126.)

June 5, 1798.

On the article explanatory of the treaty of 1794 with Great Britain, Mr. Read reported as follows:

Resolved (two-thirds of the Senators present concurring therein), That the Senate do consent to and advise the President of the United States to ratify the article explanatory of the fifth article of the treaty of amity, commerce, and navigation between the United States of America and IIis Britannic Majesty, laid before the Senate in the message of the President of the United States, dated the twentyninth day of May, seventeen hundred and ninety-eight.

(Ex. Jour., vol. 1, pp. 278, 279, 280.)

June 21, 1798. Mr. Goodhue made the following report:

The Committee on Foreign Relations, to whom was referred that portion of the speech of the President which refers to the security of the commerce of the United States and to whom was also referred the message of the President in regard to the relations of the United States with the Republic of France, having given the subjects to them committed most careful and mature consideration, beg leave to report to the Senate that they recommend the adoption of the following:

Whereas the treaties concluded between the United States and

France have been repeatedly violated on the part of the French Government, and the just claims of the United States for reparation of the injuries so committed have been refused, and their attempts to negotiate an amicable adjustment of all complaints between the two nations have been repelled with indignity; and whereas, under authority of the French Government, there is yet pursued against the United States a system of predatory violence, infracting the said treaties and hostile to the rights of a free and independent nation:

Be it therefore enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the treaty of amity and commerce and the treaty of alliance between the United States and the French Government, concluded on the sixth day of February, one thousand seven hundred and seventy-eight, and the consular convention between the same parties, concluded on the fourteenth of November, one thousand seven hundred and eightyeight, under existing circumstances, ought to be, and are hereby, declared void and of no effect, and shall no longer be binding on the Government and citizens of the United States.

SIXTH CONGRESS, FIRST SESSION.

December 24, 1799.
On the treaty with Tunis Mr. Bingham reported as follows:

Resolred (two-thirds of the Senators present concurring therein), That the Senate do advise and consent to the ratification of the eleventh, twelfth, and fourteenth articles of the treaty of peace and friendship between the United States of America and the Bey and Government of Tunis, according to the substance and form of the said articles as they now appear in the treaty, they having been the subject-matter of a new negotiation in the month of March, one thousand seven hundred and ninety-nine, when the contracting parties agreed to their present modification through their agents empowered for that purpose.

(Ex. Jour., pp. 327, 328, 329, 330.)

SIXTH CONGRESS, SECOND SESSION.

January 19, 1801. Mr. Morris, from the Committee on Foreign Relations, made the following report:

Your committee, to whom it was referred to reduce the several votes of the Senate on the convention between the French Republic and the United States of America into the form of a ratification, beg leave to report the following resolution:

Resolved by the Senate of the United States (two-thirds of the Senotors present concurring therein), That they do consent to and advise the ratification of the convention between the French Republic and the United States of America, made at Paris the eighth day of Vendemiaire of the ninth year of the French Republic, the thirtieth day of September, anno Domini eighteen hundred: Providedl, The second and third articles be expunged and that the following articles be added or inserted:

It is understood that nothing in this convention shall be so construed

as to operate contrary to any former and existing treaties between either of the parties and any other state or sovereign.

It is agreed that the present convention shall be in force for the term of eight

years from the time of the exchange of the ratifications.
(Ex. Jour., vol. 1, pp. 370, 372.)

SEVENTH CONGRESS, FIRST SESSION.

December 18, 1801.

On the treaty with France Mr. Logan reported as follows:

That the Senate consider the convention between the United States and the French Republic as fully ratified, and therefore return the same to the President of the United States for the usual promulgation.

(Ex. Jour., vol. 1, pp. 397, 398.)

EIGHTH CONGRESS, TIRST SESSION.

October 25, 1803.

On granting authority to the President of the United States to take possession of the territories ceded by France to the United States by the treaty concluded at Paris on the 30th of April, 1803, Mr. Breckinridge reported the following bill:

Be it enacted, etc., That the President of the United States be, and he hereby is, authorized to take possession of and occupy the territory ceded by France to the United States by the treaty concluded at Paris on the thirtieth day of April last between the two nations, and that he may for that purpose and in order to maintain in the said territories the authority of the United States employ any part of the Army and Navy of the United States and of the force authorized by an act passed the third day of March last, intituled “An act directing a detachment from the militia of the United States, and for erecting certain arsenals,” which he may deem necessary; and so much of the sum appropriated by the said act as may be necessary is hereby appropriated for the purpose of carrying this act into effect, to be applied under the direction of the President of the United States.

That until the expiration of the present session of Congress, unless provision for the temporary government of the said territories be sooner made by Congress, all the military, civil, and judicial powers exercised by the officers of the existing government of the same shall be vested in such person or persons and shall be exercised in such manner as the President of the United States shall direct for maintaining and protecting the inhabitants of Louisiana in the free enjoyment of their liberty, property, and religion.

(Leg. Jour., vol. 3, pp. 301, 302; Annals, Sth Cong., 1st sess.,

Stat. L., vol. 2, p. 215.)

25;

November 1, 1803.

As to authorizing the creation of stock for the purpose of carrying into effect the convention of the 30th of April, 1803, between the

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