Lectures on Memory Culture

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E.L. Kellogg & Company, 1899 - 146 pages

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Page 95 - The village smithy stands ; The smith, a mighty man is he, With large and sinewy hands ; And the muscles of his brawny arms Are strong as iron bands. His hair is crisp, and black, and long, His face is like the tan ; His brow is wet with honest sweat, He earns whate'er he can, And looks the whole world in the face, For he owes not any man.
Page 96 - Week in, week out, from morn till night, You can hear his bellows blow ; You can hear him swing his heavy sledge, With measured beat and slow, Like a sexton ringing the village bell When the evening sun is low.
Page 96 - Singing in the village choir, And it makes his heart rejoice. It sounds to him like her mother's voice, Singing in Paradise ! He needs must think of her once more, How in the grave she lies ; And with his hard, rough hand he wipes A tear out of his eyes.
Page 96 - He goes on Sunday to the church, And sits among his boys ; He hears the parson pray and preach, He hears his daughter's voice, Singing in the village choir, And it makes his heart rejoice. It sounds to him like her mother's voice, Singing in Paradise ! He needs must think of her once more, How in the grave she lies ; And with his hard, rough hand he wipes A tear out of his eyes.
Page 97 - Toiling, — rejoicing,— sorrowing, Onward through life he goes; Each morning sees some task begin, Each evening sees its close ; Something attempted, something done, Has earned a night's repose. Thanks, thanks to thee, my worthy friend, For the lesson thou hast taught ! Thus at the flaming forge of life Our fortunes must be wrought ; Thus on its sounding anvil shaped Each burning deed and thought ! ENDYMION.
Page 20 - 1. William the Conqueror. A word must now be made from William; the first half wil, is taken, and to this is added low, by which willow is obtained; this enables us to remember William. The willow is fixed upon the tower of Babel, our first symbol. We have then William the I.
Page 146 - Valoir, to be worth; valant, valu, e — je vaux, tu vaux, il vaut, nous valons, vous valez, ils valent — je valais, je valus, je vaudrai, je vaudrais— (no imperative) — que je vaille, que tu vailles, qu'il vaille, que nous valions, que vous valiez, qu'ils vaillent, que je valusse, qu'il valût.
Page 143 - Je prends, tu prends, il prend, nous prenons, vous prenez, ils prennent. — Je prenais.

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