Memoir of John Lang Bickersteth [by C.B. Wheeler].

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Religious Tract Society [18]̲̲., 1799 - 103 pages
 

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Page 41 - It is a most touching thing to me," he said once in the hearing of one of his former pupils, on the mention of some new comers, " to receive a new fellow from his father — when I think what an influence there is in this place for evil as well as for good. I do not know anything which affects me more.
Page 43 - ... and civilizations, we are apt, I imagine, to find it hard to realize. But here, in the nakedness of boy-nature, one is quite able to understand how there could not be found so many as even ten righteous in a whole city. And how to meet this evil I really do not know ; but to find it thus rife after I have been [so many] years fighting against it, is so sickening, that it is very hard not to throw up the cards in despair, and upset the table. But then the stars of nobleness, which I...
Page 41 - I have had some of the troubles of school-keeping; and one of those specimens of the evil of boy-nature, which makes me always unwilling to undergo the responsibility of advising any man to send his son to a public school. There has been a system of persecution carried on by the bad against the good, and then, when complaint was made to me, there came fresh persecution on that very account; and divers instances of boys joining in it out of pure cowardice, both physical and moral, when if left to...
Page 3 - Wherewithal shall a young man cleanse his way ? by taking heed thereto according to thy word.
Page 41 - ... instances of boys joining in it out of pure cowardice, both physical and moral, when if left to themselves they would have rather shunned it. And the exceedingly small number of boys, who can be relied on for active and steady good on these occasions, and the way in which the decent and...
Page 42 - ... relied on for active and steady good, on these occasions, and the way in which the decent and respectable of ordinary life, (Carlyle's ' Shams,') are sure on these occasions to swim with the stream, and take part with the evil, — makes me strongly feel exemplified what the Scripture says about ' the strait gate ' and the ' wide ' one, — a view of human nature which, when looking on human life in its full dress of decencies and civilizations, we are apt, I imagine, to find it hard to realize.
Page 43 - Scripture says about the strait gate and the wide one, — a view of human nature, which, when looking on human life in its full dress of decencies and civilizations, we are apt, I imagine, to find it hard to realize. But here, in the nakedness of boy-nature, one is quite able to understand how there could not be found so many as even ten righteous in a whole city.
Page 42 - ... shams") are sure on these occasions to swim with the stream, and take part with the evil, makes me strongly feel exemplified what the Scripture says about the strait gate and the wide one — a view of human nature which, when looking on human life in its full dress of decencies and civilizations, we are apt, I imagine, to find it hard to realize ; but here, in the nakedness of boy-nature, one is quite able to understand how there could not be found even ten righteous in a whole city. And how...
Page 12 - There is laid up for us a crown of righteousness, which the Lord, the righteous Judge, shall give unto all them that love his appearing.

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