Railway Economy: A Treatise on the New Art of Transport, Its Management, Prospects and Relations ...

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Scholarly Publishing Office, University of Michigan Library, 1850 - 460 pages
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Table des matières

Kept by establishment of Belgian railways
72
Quantity of coke consumed in drawing trains depends on their magnitude
78
Table of service of engines deduced from returns of several continental railways
84
Trains propelled by different engines and under different circumstances
90
Table of mileages and quantities of carrying stock on five foreign railways
96
Mileage account should be kept of passenger traffic carried with goods train
100
Result of investigation
106
Statement of Captain Huish of carrying stock of railways in England and Scot
111
Question as to taking annual valuation of stock discussed
117
Parcels important branch of traffic of passenger trains
123
General description of goods stations
131
Average number of goods wagons of Northwestern arriving and departing daily
132
Mode of dealing with such goods at station 132 10
133
Workshops for smaller repairs of carriages
138
CHAPTER IX
140
In adjusting accounts clearing house regarded as common creditor and common
146
Tabular analysis of the passenger traffic of the railways of the United Kingdom
158
Ratio of business supplied to stations by several classes of passengers
160
Tabular analysis of the progressive development of the railways of the United
166
Tabular analysis showing the relation between the movement of the engines
172
Average composition of trains 193
174
Danger of express trains
180
Tabular analysis of the average distances which each ton of goods was trans
185
CHAPTER XII
191
Belpaires investigation of Belgian railways
197
Comparison of these expenses on Belgian and Northwestern Railways
203
May be shared among carrying stock
205
To what accounts chargeable
211
Approximate calculations made as to some English railways
218
ACCIDENTS ON RAILWAYS
265
Accidents on foreign railways
272
Fog signals
278
PLAIN RULES FOR RAILWAY TRAVELERS TO AVOID ACCIDENTS
284
Electric Telegraph suggested in early part of present century
296
Principle of American telegraph explained
302
Extent of electric communication in England and America
308
Table of nine Hudson steamers recently built
315
Steam navigation of other American rivers
323
Management of steam ferries
331
Railwaycarriages described
337
Tabular analysis of the movement of the traffic on twentyeight principal railways
343
History of their construction
349
Synopsis of the movement on the Belgian railways computed from official docu
355
Table showing the number of each class of passengers in every 100 booked
361
Railways completed and in progress by companies
367
Railways constructed in progress and projected
374
Tabular synopsis of the average daily movement of the passenger traffic and
380
Tabular analysis of the movement of the passenger traffic on the French lines
386
Table showing the progress of the railways in the Germanic States during
392
Table showing the proportions in which the German railways on January 1 1847
395
Table showing the estimated cost of construction of the railways of the Germanic
401
Vehicles of transport described
407
Do not exceed 6 per cent on capital
411
Table showing the population extent of territory and extent of railway in opera
417
Some states have assumed entire construction and working of linés in others
423
Necessity of control by an independent body admitted by all but railway directors
426
This question discussed
432
Business of stations proportional to number of passengers booked irrespective
440

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Page 42 - ... overthrows or breakings down. They will here meet with ruts, which I actually measured, four feet deep, and floating with mud, only from a wet summer. What, therefore, must it be after a winter? The only mending it receives is tumbling in some loose stones, which serve no other purpose than jolting a carriage in the most intolerable manner.
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Page 42 - I know not, in the whole range of language, terms sufficiently expressive to describe this infernal road. Let me most seriously caution all travellers who may accidentally propose to travel this terrible country, to avoid it as they would the devil, for a thousand to one they break their necks or their limbs by overthrows or breakings down.
Page 279 - ... during the night. The vehicle is perfectly lighted and warmed. The seats are cushioned; and their backs, consisting of a simple padded board, about six inches broad, are so supported that the passenger may at his pleasure turn them either way, so as to turn his face or his back to the engine. For the convenience of ladies who travel unaccompanied by gentlemen, or who otherwise desire to be apart, a small room, appropriately furnished, is sometimes attached at the end of the carriage, admission...

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