Banjo: A Story Without a Plot

Couverture
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 1970 - 326 pages
9 Avis
"Lincoln Agrippa Daily, known to his drifter cohorts on the 1920s Marseilles waterfront as "Banjo," passes his days panhandling and dreaming of starting his own little band. At night Banjo, Malty, Ginger, Dengel, Bugsy, Taloufa, Goosey, and even Jake of Home to Harlem prowl the rough waterfront bistros, drinking, looking for women, playing music, fighting, loving, and talking about their homes in Senegal, the West Indies, or the American South."--Page 4 of cover.
 

Avis des internautes - Rédiger un commentaire

Avis des utilisateurs

5 étoiles
2
4 étoiles
3
3 étoiles
3
2 étoiles
1
1 étoile
0

Review: Banjo

Avis d'utilisateur  - Laura - Goodreads

The Story without a Plot. Of course! But it doesn't mean it's a bad read. Consulter l'avis complet

Review: Banjo

Avis d'utilisateur  - Dylan Suher - Goodreads

It took me a while to get into this; I think McKay needs the surrogate of Ray to comfortably represent the subjects of the novel and indulge in the considerable speechifying to which he is prone. But ... Consulter l'avis complet

Table des matières

The Ditch
3
n The Breakwater
18
in Malty Turned Down
27
Hard Feeding
38
Jelly Roll45
45
SECOND PART
59
Meetingup
61
The Fluteboy
83
Telling Jokes
177
White Terror
188
The Blue Cinema
199
Breakingup
219
THIRD PART
225
xvhi Banjos Return
227
Lonesome Blue Again
235
The Rock of Refuge
244

A Carved Carrot
93
Talouas Shirttail
101
Storytelling
114
Everybody Doing It
133
Bugsys Chinese Pie
148
Bugsy Comes Back at Banjo
166
Official Fists
256
Reaction
269
Shake That Thing Again
280
The Chauffeurs Lot
285
Banjos Ace of Spades
301
Droits d'auteur

Expressions et termes fréquents

Références à ce livre

Tous les résultats Google Recherche de Livres »

À propos de l'auteur (1970)

Claude McKay was born in Jamaica on 15th September, 1890. He began writing poetry as a schoolboy. He worked as a policeman in Spanish Town and when he was twenty-two had his first volume of poems, Songs of Jamaica (1912) published. In 1912 McKay moved to the United States where he attended Tuskegee Institute in Alabama and Kansas State University. He continued to write poetry and in 1918 his work was praised by both Frank Harris and Max Eastman. The following year, his poem, If We Must Die, was published in Eastman's journal, The Liberator. Frank Harris encouraged McKay to obtain writing experience in England. In 1919 McKay travelled to England where he met George Bernard Shaw who introduced him to influential left-wing figures in journalism. This included Sylvia Pankhurst, who recruited him to write for her trade union journal, Workers' Dreadnought. While in London McKay read the works of Karl Marx and becomes a committed socialist. In 1921 McKay returned to New York and became associate editor of The Liberator. Over the next year the journal published articles by McKay such as How Black Sees Green and Red and He Who Gets Slapped. He also published his best known volume of verse, Harlem Shadows (1922).In 1922 McKay went to Third International in Moscow where he represented the American Workers Party. He stayed in Europe where he wrote Trial by Lynching: Stories About Negro Life in America (1925) and Home to Harlem (1928), a novel about a disillusioned black soldier in the US Army who returns from the Western Front to live in a black ghetto. This was followed by other novels such as Banjo (1928), Gingertown (1932) and Banana Bottom (1933). McKay gradually lost faith in communism and returned to the United States in 1934. Employment was difficult to find and for a while he worked for the Federal Writers' Project. McKay's published work during this period included his autobiography, A Long Way From Home (1937) and Harlem: Negro Metropolis (1940).Unable to make a living from writing, McKay found work in a shipbuilding yard. In 1943 he suffers a stroke and the following year was baptized into the Roman Catholic faith. In 1945 his essay, On Becoming a Roman Catholic, was published. Claude McKay died in Chicago on 22nd May, 1948.

Informations bibliographiques