The Genealogies, Tribes, and Customs of Hy-Fiachrach: Commonly Called O'Dowda's Country

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Irish archæological society, 1844 - 524 pages
 

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Page 525 - ... the first day of January, annually. V. Such Members as desire it may become Life Members on payment of the sum of thirteen pounds, or ten pounds (if they have already paid their entrance fee), in lieu of the annual subscription. VI. Every Member whose subscription is not in arrear shall be entitled to receive one copy of each publication of the Society issued subsequently to his admission; and the books printed by the Society shall not be sold to the Public. VII.
Page 422 - ... former customes of the countrey inviolable, and to deliver up the succession peaceably to his Tanist, and then hath a wand delivered unto him by some whose proper office that is ; after which, descending from the stone, he turneth himself round, thrice forwards and thrice backwards.
Page 422 - Captaines foot, whereon he standing, receives an oath to preserve all the auncient former customes of the countrey inviolable, and to deliver up the succession peaceably to his Tanist, and then hath a wand delivered unto him by some whose...
Page 514 - Council for the past year be received and printed, and that the thanks of the Society be given to the Council for their services.
Page 525 - FUNDAMENTAL LAWS OF THE SOCIETY. I. The number of Members shall be limited to 500. II. The affairs of the Society shall be managed by a President and Council of twelve Members, to be elected annually by the Society. III. Those Noblemen and Gentlemen who have been admitted Members prior to the first day of May, 1841, shall be deemed the original Members of the Society, and all future Members shall be elected by the Council.
Page 311 - Gaels were at this time conquering the countries far and near*, and that not one in a hundred of the Irish nobles, at this day, possesses as much of his land as he could be buried in", though they expect it in this year, 1664".
Page 457 - Sligo. This was done, and the body was buried at the other side [of the river], at Aenach Locha Gile, with the mouth down, that it might not be the means of causing them to fly before the Connacians.