Narrative of the campaigns of the Twenty-eighth Regiment, since their return from Egypt in 1802

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Whittaker & co., 1835 - 281 pages
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Page 60 - THE Army must see that the moment is now come " when, after the hardships and fatiguing marches they have undergone, they will have the opportunity of bringing the Enemy to action. The Commander of the Forces has the most perfect confidence in their valour, and that it is only necessary to bring them to close contact with the Enemy in order to defeat them ; and a defeat, if it be complete, as he trusts it will be, will, in a great measure, " end their labours. " The General has no other caution to...
Page 223 - During the campaign, we had often experienced the most gentlemanlike conduct from the French officers. A day or two before the battle, when we were upon our alarm-post, at break of day, a fine hare was seen playing in a corn-field between the outposts ; a brace of greyhounds were very soon unslipped, when, after an excellent course, poor puss was killed within the French lines. The officer to whom the dogs belonged, bowing to the French officer, called...
Page 62 - French cavalry, who have hitherto shown little mercy even to the feeble and infirm who have fallen into their hands. " The army has still eleven leagues to march, the soldiers must make an exertion to accomplish them ; the rearguard cannot stop, and those who fall behind must take their fate.
Page 205 - A daring fellow, an Irishman, named Tom Patten, performed a singular feat. At the barrier there was a rivulet, along which our lines of sentries were posted. To the right was a thick low wood, and during the cessation of hostilities our officers had again become intimate with those of the French, and the soldiers had actually established a traffic in tobacco and brandy in the following ingenious manner. A large stone was placed in that part of the rivulet screened by the wood, opposite to the French...
Page 206 - Two or three hours afterwards, just as we were about to fall in, an hour before daybreak, the sergeant came to say that a flag of .truce was at the barrier : I instantly went down, when I found the officer of the French picket in a state of great alarm, saying, that a most extraordinary circumstance had occurred (relating the adventure), and stating, that if the sentry's arms and accoutrements were not given back, his own commission would be forfeited, as well as the life of the poor sentry. A sergeant...
Page 201 - M'Kinlay, seeing one of them taking aim over the arm of a fig-tree in our direction, exclaimed, " Look at that rascal going to shoot our captain ! ' And, advancing one step down the hill, he presented at the Frenchman, who, however, was unfortunately too quick for him, for in an instant afterwards poor M'Kinlay was shot through the neck, and killed on the spot. The same...
Page 51 - Say it again,' said the general. 'Yes, yes!' was again exclaimed by all. 'Say it a third time.' 'Yes, yes, yes!' and a cheer followed.* The men were forgiven, the square was reduced, and the 52nd. regiment, under Colonel Barclay, went through the village in doublequick time, and in the most beautiful manner took possession * The same incident is related in the "Record of the 52nd. Light Infantry...
Page 46 - Officers will adopt such measures, both on the march and in the cantonments, as will ensure it. It is very probable that the Army will shortly have to meet the enemy; and the Commander of the Forces has no doubt that they will eagerly imitate the worthy example which has been set them by the Cavalry, on several recent occasions, and particularly in the affair of yesterday, in which Brigadier-General Stuart, with an inferior force, charged and overthrew one of the biggest corps of Cavalry in the French...
Page 201 - M'Kinlay was shot through the neck, and killed on the spot. The same ball gave me a severe contusion on the breast, and I fell with the unfortunate man, and was actually covered with his blood. He was one of the best soldiers in the Grenadier company, and was much regretted ; indeed, but for him, it is probable I should not have lived to tell this tale. The will was duly forwarded to the War Office, whence an order was issued for his comrade Swift to receive all that was due to him.
Page 62 - It is evident that the enemy will not fight this army, notwithstanding the superiority of his numbers, but will endeavour to harass and tease it upon its march. " The commander of the forces requests that it may be carefully explained to the soldiers that their safety depends solely upon their keeping their divisions and marching with their regiments^ that those who stop in villages or straggle on the march will inevitably be cut off by the French cavalry, who have hitherto shown little mercy even...

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