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ADDRESS.

The present day may justly be considered the Augustine age of Pictorial art. During the last few years, the most energetic and successful efforts have been made by Publishers and British Painters to create a refined taste throughout the nation for faithful and vivid delineations of native scenery. With true patriot feeling, they have sought out the charming picturesque of their own country; and revealed, with Claude-like grace and effect (the, might we not say) unequalled beauty of a British Landscape. The introduction of steel-plate engraving also lent powerful co-operation to their labours, and contributed in no small degree to produce a new era in the empire of taste. The Painter's single copy could be possessed but by one,—be seen, comparatively, by few; but when transferred by a skilful Engraver to a plate of steel, so great a number of fine impressions can be taken, that the treasures of art are sold at a price so trifling, as to place these beautiful productions within the reach of all who take interest in them,—and who does not ?

Amidst the laudable efforts which are being made in the present day, to render each cherished spot of earth “the mind's familiar image,” it might well excite surprise if the pencil and burin sought not employment in delineating the LAKE AND MOUNTAIN SCENERY of “our native land.” With what success the attempt has been attended, let the numerous specimens of art contained in this work declare. The sublime and beautiful in nature-all that renders earth “ an Eden scarce defaced”—are here reflected in a mirror more potent than the wizard's glass. This collection of native scenery should kindle love of country in the hearts of all : it is a faithful transcript of " father-land,” on which an Englishman may look with pride. Admit it—a cheerful visitant-to the domestic hearth. It will speak to you of your country; and in the festive seasons of mirth and gaiety, no less than in the hour of calm reflection, it will remind you " 'tis your country still.”

To give an idea of the magnitude of this undertaking, and the fearless enterprise with which the Proprietors engaged in it, a statement is subjoined, shewing the extent of capital employed in the Work. It is pleasing to add, that whilst its thousands of Subscribers are unanimous in expressing satisfaction and delight, the Publishers, and all who, under their direction, aided the progress of the Work, have no reason to adopt the language of complaint,

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LIST

OF P L A T E S.

1 Vignette Title-Langdale Pikes, page 5.

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38 Lowdore Cataract 39 Lowther Castle, South Front . 40 Lowther Castle, North Front 41 Mardale Head . 42 Mitford Castle 43 Morpeth. 44 Newcastle, Tyne 45 Newcastle, Interior of Castle Chapel, 46 Newcastle, Royal Arcade 47 Newcastle, Church of St. Nicholas 48 Raby Castle . 49 Ravensworth Castle 50 Rosthwaite, Village of, 51 Rydal Water, Lower Fall 52 Rydal Water, Upper Fall. 53 Scale Force. 54 Scawfell Pikes 55 Scotswood Bridge, over the Tyne. 56 Shields, North and South 57 Skiddaw, from Applethwaite 58 Stickle Tarn, Langdale Pikes 59 Stockgill Force 60 Stockgill, Mill on the, . 61 Sunderland. 62 Sunderland, Harbour and Pier 63 Thirlmere, or Wythburn Water 64 Troutbeck, Valley of, 65 Tynemouth Priory 66 Ullswater 67 Ullswater, Upper Reach, 68 Ullswater, from Pooley Bridge . 69 Underlay Hall . 70 Warkworth Castle .

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2 Airey Force .
3 Alnwick Castle
4 Appleby
5 Barnard Castle
6 Bishop Auckland, Palace at,
7 Blea Tarn
8 Bothal Castle
9 Bowness and Windermere
10 Brancepeth Castle .
11 Brougham Hall
12 Buttermere, from the Wood
13

Carlisle,
14 Castle Crag, Borrowdale
15 Castle Eden Hall .

16 Cockermouth. _17 Colwith Force,

18 Corby Castle.
19 Crummock Water
20 Derwentwater
21 Derwentwater and Lowdore.
22 Derwentwater, from Applethwaite
23 Dinsdale Spa
24 Dungeon Gill .
25 Durham
26 Durham, from the South
27 Finchale Priory.
28 Grasmere Lake and Village
29 Hartlepool
30 Hawes Water, from Thwaite Force
31 Hexham Abbey Church
32 Howick Hall
33 Kendal, from the Castle .
34 Keswick, from Greta Bridge.
35 Lambton Castle
36 Lanercost Priory.
37 Levins Hall.

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PICTURESQUE ILLUSTRATIONS

OF

WESTMORLAND, CUMBERLAND, DURHAM,

AND

NORTHUMBERLAND.

LANGDALE PIKES,-WESTMORLAND.

LANGDALE Pikes, situate at the western extremity of Westmorland, in the immediate vicinity of Bowfell, exhibit some of the principal characteristic features of lake and mountain scenery. Separated by a valley, through which runs the river Brathay, these hills rise on each side to an astonishing height, and form a vast amphitheatre, where the simple beauties of nature unite, in effect, with the loftier and more sublime creations of the Almighty hand.

The highest pike, known in the neighbourhood by the name of Harrison Stickle, is elevated 2,400 feet above the level of the sea; and the other, called Pike o'Stickle, 2,000 feet. From these hills, a fine blue slate is obtained, much of which is sent to London, and other parts of the kingdom.

In the fore-ground of the view, we notice the fragments of rock which follow the windings of the road, and form a romantic entrance to the valley; the guide-post, indicating a connexion with the dwellings of man; and the lone traveller, with his laden beast, bome returning, toil-worn and weary. Proceeding onward, we traverse the windings of the Brathay river, which at length terminate in a distant and narrow dell. Here the contemplative angler may enjoy his Walton, and allure the playful trout to his hook; delighted with the strip of verdure that skirts along the stream, from its striking contrast with the barrenness which extends around. The eye then glances, not without interest, on the heathy wilderness that covers the hill-side ; and though the distant fires are easily explained, imagination views them as altars whence the circling incense rises, grateful to the genius of the scene.

Feelings of reverence, of astonishment, of undefined pleasure, flow through the heart, as we fix our earnest gaze upon the surrounding hills. The lightnings have furrowed their sides with deep and awsul ravines, the thunder-scars of a thousand tempests. Many, many winters have poured the snows upon their heads; as many summers have scorched them with a noon-day sun. Still they remain in their place, asserting the wonders of creative power: a memento of past ages--a record for a future race of men.

B

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PICTURESQUE ILLUSTRATIONS OF WESTMORLAND,

HOWICK HALL,--NORTHUMBERLAND.

Pleasantly situated on the Northumbrian coast, at the distance of four miles from Alnwick, is Howick Hall, the seat of Earl Grey; whose family have held possession of the manor of Howick for several centuries.

Sir Henry Grey, Bart., one of the ancestors of the present Earl, erected the parish church; a neat edifice, without a tower, and in the Greek style, standing on the margin of a brook that skirts the lawn of the manorial house. He also founded a free-school for the children of his tenants; and endowed it with ten pounds per annum, chargeable on the Howick estate. This endowment was augmented with a rent-charge of thirteen pounds, by Mrs. Magdalen Grey. The school-room has been recently rebuilt; and in addition to the former grants, the master now receives five pounds per annum from the present Earl.

The old tower of Howick, mentioned by Leland, is entered by a flight of steps, and is still a goodly structure. In its immediate vicinity are the remains of a Roman encampment; and more than half a century ago, many relics of “ the eternal city" were here discovered, and removed into the antiquary's cabinet.

Howick Hall, the modern building, was erected towards the close of the eighteenth century, under the direction of Mr. Newton, of Newcastle. Within the last eight years, the furniture and internal decorations have been renewed, and the wings of the edifice united to the centre by intermediate buildings. The gateways have been altered, and new approaches made to the hall; the lawn has also been broken, and disposed in better style.

The west front of this elegant mansion is seen to great advantage in the view before us; and forms, with the wings and connecting buildings, an imposing and splendid

The lawn sweeps in a magnificent slope to the margin of a fine trout water; which, after flowing through the shrubberies and plantations, passes away by a gentle fall.

The gardens are perfect“ realms of fairy,” enriched with every species of native flowers and exotics, on which Flora has bestowed a more than ordinary richness of scent, or beauty of appearance.

Into this calm, yet princely retreat, Earl Grey may occasionally retire from the tumult of applauding multitudes, and the fatigues of legislative duty; but again and again he will be called from the scene of quiet, as was the Roman dictator of old, to resume the management of national affairs, and to conserve the interests of his country. In the

Biographical Sketches of the Reform Ministers,” Mr. Jones, gives a faithful summary of Earl Grey's character in so few words, and in terms so apposite, that with it we conclude our notices of Howick Hall.--"He has, says the author, “ eloquence of the highest and rarest stamp-instinct with deliberative wisdom and classic fire, set off by a personal delivery, at once popular and noble; and an exalted integrity of character, upon which calumny has never ventured to breathe.”

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