A Bengálí Grammar

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J. Thomas, Baptist Mission Press, 1849 - 151 pages
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Page 47 - ... between the Creator and the creature, the king and the subject, the master and the servant, the animate and the inanimate," And again: " If a person speaks with the greatest humility of himself, or with the greatest contempt of another, he employs this form, but it is not found in good composition. From these strictures, however, the third person must be exempted, as it is used in all good composition for expressing common facts or events, and will on that ground in future be embodied in the...
Page 35 - It would be well for the first and second of these pronouns (mui and tut), and for the verbs that agree with them, to be expunged from the language ; yet as they are frequently used in common conversation, it is necessary to notice them, to enable the student to understand what he will frequently hear. The third often answers a useful purpose in distinguishing between the Creator and the creature, the king and the subject, the master and the servant, the animate and the inanimate.
Page 149 - September October October November November December December January January February February March March April...
Page 150 - ... from the Hindi and Hindustani, and partly also from the English. This is used by almost all Muhammadans who speak Bengali ; by most persons in the employ of Europeans ; and especially by those who are engaged in commerce and in judicial matters. It would be pedantry to proscribe all foreign words from the Bengali language ; because in many cases they are the only terms which exist or which are likely to be understood. But it is highly desirable to avoid the use of those for which indigenous terms,...
Page 118 - RULE XVIII. Conjunctions connect the same moods and tenses of verbs, and cases of nouns and pronouns ; as, " Candour is to be approved and practised ;" " If thou sincerely desire, and earnestly pursue virtue, she •will assuredly be found by thee, and prove a rich reward ;" " The master taught her and me to write ;" " He and she were school-fellows.
Page 150 - Another kind of style may be called the impure style, because it borrows too largely from the Hindi and Hindustani, and partly also from the English. This is used by almost all Muhammadans who speak Bengali ; by most persons in the employ of Europeans ; and especially by those who are engaged in commerce and in judicial matters. It would be pedantry to proscribe all foreign words from the Bengali language ; because in many cases they are the only terms which exist or which are likely to be understood....
Page 151 - ... purposes of a language. It abounds in terms relating to domestic and agricultural life ; but is poor as soon as another province of thought requires to be occupied. The book style, which is also becoming current in conversation, is a language seeking to occupy the golden medium between the familiar and the pedantic; by preferring to all other words those Sanscrit elements which the familiar language has retained, or altered only slightly, and by avoiding all compound words the component parts...
Page 150 - ... style, which should be most carefully avoided, viz. the vulgar and the pedantic. The vulgar style betrays itself by the use of the inferior verb and pronoun in the first and second persons. The pedantic style may be known by its being imperfectly understood by all those who have not studied Sanscrit : its faults lie chiefly in the introduction of compound words when they are not needed, and in the choice of such compounds as consist of words not in common use ; also in the unnecessary adoption...
Page 21 - ... jane (many know that). In this case too I rather incline to consider e as the remnant of the ancient plural termination than to take it for the sign of the locative case, as Dr. Yates suggests, particularly as he observes that in good Bengali it is only used in adjectives which indicate a number, when the noun is merely understood ; as sakale, aneke, &c., where we find e as the termination of the plural already in Sanscrit. The termination of the nominative plural is...
Page 151 - Bengali language ; because in many cases they are the only terms which exists or which is likely to be understood. But it is highly desirable to avoid the use of those for which indigenous terms derived from the Sanscrit, are either already provided by the daily language, or may be introduced into it with every prospect of being as plain and intelligible as the exotic words now in common use. "The familiar style is used by most of the natives of Bengal in their own houses, and in their daily intercourse...

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