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lost or damaged, the sender or, in default or at the request of the sender, the addressee is entitled to an indemnity corresponding with the actual amount of the loss or damage, provided always that this indemnity may not exceed in the case of an uninsured parcel 25 fr. or 15 fr., according as the weight of the parcel exceeds or does not exceed 3 kilog. or 7 lb. avoirdupois.

"The sender of a lost parcel is also entitled to have the postage refunded."

III. This Agreement shall come into operation on the 1st day of January, 1895.

Done in duplicate at London, on the 18th day of December, 1894; and at the Hague, on the 31st day of December, 1894. (L.S.) ARNOLD MORLEY. (L.S.) HAVELAAR.

AGREEMENT between Great Britain and Portugal, for the Insurance of Postal Parcels.-Signed at Lisbon, March 10, 1894.*

THE Governments of Her Majesty the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, and of His Majesty the King of Portugal and the Algarves, wishing to provide for the insurance of parcels transmitted by Parcel Post between their respective countries under the Agreement of the 2nd July, 1887,† the Undersigned, duly authorized for that purpose, have agreed upon the following provisions:

ART. I.-1. The parcels exchanged by Parcel Post between Great Britain on the one hand, and Portugal, the Azores, and Madeira on the other hand, may be insured. This provision will, at the outset, apply exclusively to parcels exchanged direct between the United Kingdom and Portugal or Madeira.

2. The two Post Offices shall mutually serve as intermediaries for the exchange of insured parcels to and from the other countries with which they respectively maintain similar exchanges. They shall communicate to each other the amount of the insurance fee to be credited in each case and the other conditions of the service. II. The maximum amount for which parcels exchanged between the United Kingdom on the one hand, and Portugal, the Azores,

* Signed also in the Portuguese language.
+ Vol. LXXVIII, page 7.

and Madeira on the other hand, may be insured is 207. (500 fr.) in the United Kingdom and 1008000 reis in Portugal, the Azores or Madeira.

III. The insurance fee, which shall be paid at the same time as the postage, shall be in the United Kingdom 24d. for each 127. or fraction of 127. of insured value, and in Portugal, the Azores, and Madeira, 50 reis for each 608000 reis or fraction of 608000 reis of insured value.

IV.-1. The insurance for each 127. or 60 000 reis of insured value levied on parcels posted in the United Kingdom addressed to Portugal or Madeira, or posted in Portugal or Madeira addressed to the United Kingdom, shall be apportioned as follows:—

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2. In the case of parcels exchanged between the United Kingdom and the Azores by way of Lisbon or Madeira, the Office of origin shall pay to the Office of destination for each 127. or 608000 reis of insured value, 15 centimes in respect of the land and sea service.

V. If it shall be subsequently determined to allow the insurance of parcels exchanged between the United Kingdom and Portugal, the Azores, and Madeira, by way of France, the two Post Offices shall fix by common consent both the amount of the insurance fees to be paid by the senders of such parcels and the apportionment of those fees.

VI. On every insured parcel sent under this Agreement the Administration of the country of origin may levy a registration fee not exceeding 24d. or 50 reis, to be paid by the sender in addition to the insurance fee. This registration fee shall be retained by the Office which levies it.

VII. When an insured parcel is redirected or returned to the Office of origin, a new insurance fee is collected from the addressee or the sender, as the case may be.

So far as the relations of the two Administrations are concerned, the amount of the insurance fees on redirected or returned parcels and the apportionment of such amount shall be regulated in the same manner as the amount and apportionment of the fees levied on other parcels passing between the two countries.

VIII. Compensation for the loss or damage of insured parcels shall be paid in accordance with Article XI of the Agreement of the 2nd July, 1887; but the compensation paid in the case of any one parcel shall not exceed the sum for which it has been insured.

IX. In the case of all parcels containing coin, objects of gold or silver, or other precious articles, exchanged between the United Kingdom and Portugal, the Azores, and Madeira, insurance is obligatory. If such a parcel is forwarded uninsured, the Administration which delivers it is entitled to collect the proper insurance fee from the addressee, and to retain the same.

X. No parcel may be insured for an amount above the real value of its contents. In case the sender of an insured parcel, with intent to defraud, declares the contents to be above their real value, he loses all claim to compensation; and the enforcement of this rule does not prejudice any judicial proceedings of which the law of the country of origin may admit.

XI. The provisions of the Agreement of the 2nd July, 1887, remain generally applicable to insured postal parcels. Moreover, the following additional detailed regulations are applicable to such parcels:

1. An insured parcel must bear on the cover, as well as on the dispatch note, a statement of the amount for which it is insured; and no erasure or addition, even if certified, is allowed. When this statement is made in English or Portuguese money, the sender or the Post Oflice of origin must indicate by new figures placed beside or below the others, the equivalent of the amount in francs and centimes.

2. The same dispatch note cannot be used with both insured and uninsured parcels.

3. The exact weight of an insured parcel in kilog. and grammes must be entered by the Office of origin both on the cover of the parcel and on the dispatch note in the place provided for the purpose.

4. Each insured parcel must bear a red label with the word "insured" or "valeur déclarée " " upon it.

5. The labels on insured parcels containing coin, articles of gold or silver, jewellery, or other precious objects, must be so placed that they cannot serve to conceal injuries to the cover. They must not be folded over two sides of the cover so as to hide the edge. The address in such cases must be written on the actual covering of the parcels.

6. The parcel bills used for the service shall be enlarged by the addition of columns for the entry of the weight of insured parcels, and the sums in fraucs and centimes for which they are insured.

XII. The present Agreement shall come into operation on a date to be fixed by the two Post Offices, and shall be terminable on a notice of one year by either party.

In witness whereof the Undersigued, duly authorized for that

purpose, have signed the present Agreement, and have affixed thereto their seals.

Done in duplicate at Lisbon on the 10th day of March, 1894. (L.S.) H. G. MACDONELL.

(L.S.)

FREDERICO DE GUSMAN
CORRÊA AROUCA.

NOTES exchanged between Great Britain and Spain, respecting the Commercial Relations between the two Countries.-Madrid, December 28, 29, 1894.

Sir H. Wolff to the Spanish Minister for Foreign Affairs.

M. LE MINISTRE,

Madrid, December 28, 1894. CIRCUMSTANCES having impeded the further negotiations for a definite Commercial Treaty, the Government of Her Majesty, my august Sovereign, are prepared to record in a more formal manner the understanding now existing between the United Kingdom and Spain for the regulation of their mutual commercial relations. They understand that this course will for many reasons be convenient to the Government of His Catholic Majesty.

It is therefore understood between the two Governments that they maintain the Agreement entered into between them in the month of June last, by the note addressed by me to your Excellency's predecessor on the 20th June, 1894, and the note I had the honour to receive from Señor Moret under date of the 29th of the same month. Such Agreement shall remain in force until a permanent Treaty be concluded, or unless it be terminated by one of the parties, who shall, with this object, give the other a notice of six months.

The following is the understanding existing between Great Britain and Spain referred to in Sir H. Wolff's above despatch and made public [in the press] in July 1894:

"Under the provisions of an Act recently passed by the Spanish Cortes, goods arriving in Spain and her Colonies from the United Kingdom and the British Colonies will continue to receive the same treatment as heretofore, namely, in the Peninsula and the adjacent islands the Minimum Tariff, together with the advantages conceded by Treaty to Switzerland, Sweden and Norway, and the Netherlands, or other European States, except Portugal.

"In the Spanish Colonies, such goods will continue to be treated under the Minimum Column of the Colonial Tariff.

"This treatment will be maintained until a permanent Commercial Treaty is concluded between the United Kingdom and Spain, or until the negotiations now pending for the conclusion of such a Treaty are formally broken off."

As before, it is agreed that it shall be open to any British Colony to withdraw from the present Agreement, on notice to that effect being given by Her Majesty's Ambassador at Madrid to the Spanish Minister for Foreign Affairs within six months after the date of its signature. I avail, &c.,

Señor Groizard.

H. D. WOLFF.

The Spanish Minister for Foreign Affairs to Sir H. Wolff.

(Translation.)

M. L'AMBASSADEUR,

Palace, December 29, 1894.

I HAVE had the honour to receive the note which your Excellency communicated to me on the 28th instant, to the effect that circumstances having impeded the continuation of the negotiations for a definitive Treaty of Commerce between Spain and the United Kingdom, the Government of Her Britannic Majesty is prepared to record in a more formal manner the understanding now existing for the regulation of their commercial relations.

The Government of His Catholic Majesty, who believe that this understanding will be, for various reasons, equally convenient to that of Her Britannic Majesty, consider that the Agreement entered into by exchange of notes under date of the 20th and 29th June last, between your Excellency and my predecessor, Señor Moret, is maintained until the conclusion of a definitive Treaty, unless it be terminated by one of the High Contracting Parties, who shall, with this object, give to the other a notice of six months.

As before, it is agreed that it shall be open to any British Colony to withdraw from the present Agreement on notice to that effect being given by the Ambassador at Madrid to the Spanish Minister for Foreign Affairs within six months after the date of its signature. I avail, &c.,

Sir H. D. Wolff.

ALEJANDRO GROIZARD.

CONVENTION between Great Britain and the United States, extending the Term provided in the Convention of July 22, 1892,* for the Survey of the Alaska Boundary Line.Signed at Washington, February 3, 1894.

[Ratifications exchanged at Washington, March 28, 1894.]

THE Governments of Her Majesty the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and of the United States of * Vol. LXXXIV, page 70.

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